Make your own free website on Tripod.com

chaney genealogy project
[ Chaney | Surnames | Genealogist | Messages | Links | Achives | E-Mail | Registration | Home ]

notes

[NI0012] In 1945, NATHAN DIXON HUNT wrote three letters which were copied by ROOSEVE FERN HUNT. They appeared in her genealogical research.

Chicago, Illinois
608 N. Lorel Ave.
January 30th, 1945

SPENCER DIXON --

Remembering your expressed wish for family records and history, I am nursing a cold, gratifying a desire to record family data and I hope amusing you in some way. A few facts of the WALKER -- DIXON family side of your family that I have collected and remember --

CHARLES WALKER (your Great-Great-Grandfather) had children born in Kentucky, Indiana and Texas. He migrated from Kentucky to Indiana in the year 1823, and to Texas from Scaffold Prairie neighborhood west of Worthington) in 1939. On the day of his departure his daughter, MARY JANE (age 16, born in Kentucky) married DANIEL GREGG DIXON, whose family had moved to southern Indiana about the same time, through Madison, Indiana. CHARLES WALKER apparently prospered and his descendants in Texas in turn spread to the ocean, leaving a zig-zag migratory trail that started in Northern Ireland, Ulster, and continued the Westward trek from North Carolina, filtering through the Blue Ridge and Cumberland Mountains, probably the Cumberland Gap, into the Ohio Valley.
The first part of this is imaginary, more or less, but follows the known trail of the Scotch-Irish. If they entered at a Northern Port, they drifted down the Eastern slopes of the Appalachians, through the Shenandoah Valley into the Carolinas, where they paused to catch their breathes and took a run
and jump over and through the mountains into Tennessee and Kentucky. Ports of entry were New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Charleston.
The pattern applies to the DIXON clan up the Ohio River; individuals being traceable only from that point. Some branched off in Tennessee.
The DIXON's of our and collateral branches, when their feet got hot, stood up in Southern Indiana, facing the sunset, marched straight into it, marking their trail nearly in a straight line to the Western States, leaving unidentified descendants, townships, counties and towns honored by their name. Other branches of the DIXON family buried their dead in various cemeteries and emigrated more completely than the WALKERS. The WALKERS, in Texas, became slave holders and absorbed the Southern view of the political issues of that day. Two brothers of MARY JANE WALKER DIXON enlisted in the Southern Army, were captured and landed in the Indianapolis prison stockade. DANIEL G. DIXON secured their parole and one, JAMES (a younger brother who MARY JANE had never seen) was reconstructed, being perhaps one of the first victims of that period of our history, and enlisted in the Northern Army. He died in 1865, somewhere in Kentucky on his way to the front. His body was shipped to Indianapolis, teamed to Greene County, where he lies beside his sister MARY JANE in the Dixon Cemetery.
SAMUEL DIXON, who is buried in Worthington Cemetery, had two sons we know of. DANIEL G., our forbearer, and WILLIAM by a second wife. DANIEL's descendants generally remained in or about and returned to Greene County for their final rest.
Other branches of our common ancestors -- the GREGGS -- WRIGHTS and MUMFORDS. Scotch-Irish stock appears to have followed the same general patten in converging on the Ohio crossings in Kentucky. One, the DUVALS, of Louisville, Kentucky, may have been French.
Speaking of SAMUEL DIXON's son, WILLIAM; he left one son, MANUEL, who was raised by and with the family of DANIEL G. and died in Linton. WILLIAM was a Forty-Niner, going to California through the Panama Route. He returned with a belt of gold and a sore leg, overland. (I have a three legged cast iron pot brought back by WILLIAM in which he brewed herbs with which he treated his leg.) Later he married an INGERSOLL, cousin of Grandmother HUNT and her brother, J.W. INGERSOLL, and went west of Fort Bridger, west of Cheyenne somewhere, and homesteaded in Oregon, where his descendants are scattered through the North West Pacific States and Montana. Two Grandsons are doctors, practicing somewhere East of the Rockies, as last heard by us.
There is unverified record of MARY JANE and DANIEL DIXON residing in Vigo County, Indiana but their first permanent home appears to have been Point Commerce, a defunct village, on the heights across the Eel River from Worthington. (A plague visited the White River Valley in the early fifties,
or late forties, and mysteriously wiped out a goodly part of the population. This caused the abandonment of Point Commerce and the making of Worthington. Perhaps the plague only contributed temporarily to the depopulation of Point Commerce, but Worthington was being developed as a shipping point on the canal being built from Terre Haute south.) The next permanent record we have is the Old Dixon homestead west of the extinct Dixon Station and south of the Newsom home of your Grandmother.
The alleged DIXON physical and character traits are largely, in my opinion, WALKER. (My late Aunt MAT GECKLER would catch me up short on this.) The high forehead and width between the WALKER ears, is modified in the children, by the broad wrinkled and benign forehead of DANIEL G., forming a new pattern in which all of their children are molded and later descendants to the fourth generation, are unmistakably marked by this mold. MARY JANE WALKER DIXON was a modern matriarch, ruling her family to her last active days. During an illness she required the presence of my mother, ANNA DIXON HUNT. The Pennsylvania Railroad called out a section crew with a hand pump car and issued orders for them to run from Switz City to Dixon and return, after midnight, carrying my Mother. I was also a passenger. This was done perhaps to mollify her for the killing of a cow, which the Railroad would not pay for, claiming the cow trespassed. The family skeleton has whispered that she at one time greased the rails of the Dixon Hill in retaliation. Grandmother was the country Doctor of her time and was widely consulted. She physicked the adult generation of Fairplay Township, then brought their offsprings into this world and repeated on them. It is of record she was the first licensed woman doctor in Indiana.
DANIEL was a good provider, engaged in flatboating down Lattas Creek, White, Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. A canalboat Captain between Terre Haute and Evansville on the Canal, crossing the White River at Newberry. He also engaged in teaming supplies in the that country, hauling iron for the first iron bridge across White River, located a mile north of the present steel bridge, East of Bloomfield.
The family must have been Methodist as your Grandfather was named CHARLES WESLEY. He was the reckless, handsome and daring Beau Brummel of his time and a superior mechanic. He had many admirable qualities. (Without prejudice or exact information, I express the opinion that his WALKER mother (MARY JANE), of a slave holding family, prevented him from enlisting in the Northern Army, as it was the great adventure of his age and would be a natural for his type.) There is no record of the DIXONS holding slaves after they left Kentucky.
This in general is half of your background, if you at any time want to further back you can at the expenditure of decades of time and fortunes of money, do so, but remember eight generations back, you have one hundred and twenty eight antecedents and I would recall to you the experience of the parents of Midshipman, Jack Easy, who in erecting a family tree for him, found an ancestor hanging in it.
Wishing you a successful trip and a return to your family within the allotted time, I remain, Yours truly

NATHAN DIXON HUNT

(MARY JANE and DANIEL G. DIXON had fifteen children, including a set of twins, eight of which reached the age of maturity, your Grandfather and his brothers and sisters.) <1>


February 12, 1945

SPENCER DIXON
Enroute Hawaii

P.S. to my letter of January 30th.

DANIEL G., my grandfather, died in 1874, leaving a well equipped home and farm, and investments in Indianapolis vacancies. The estate was administered by ZACK NICHOLS, a son-in-law. Under his administration the Indianapolis lots disappeared and the home and farm estate diminished to a
small triangular piece of ground east of the railroad in Dixon Station, where my first and only recollection of Grandmother (MARY JANE DIXON) started in about 1880. She occupied a small house, one of two on the land; the other was occupied for awhile by your grandparents. DAN DIXON was born there. She also owned some vacant lots on the west side of the railroad, some small residences and a store building. In this building she had a small general stock of goods, was Post Mistress and practiced medicine in her home. She had NELSON GASKINS, who married KATE AMODINE, as a helper. WALKER GASKINS was born there as well as myself. WALKER began his railroad career there early, attending a switch light, I have heard. As related by DEBBIE INGERSOLL MILLER, I also had my first railroad experience there. When her mother brought her to see me, one month old, and was allowed to hold me, a train whistle sounded the approach of a train and she suddenly jumped up and ran out to "see the train," with my head dangling over her arm. she said that was the reason for my gangling neck.
Part of the ground occupied by grandmother was tilled and part was an unfenced pasture used by her cows, and hogs, her neighbor's stock too; few fenced their stock. Her hogs strayed further often but her calling was equal to any distance up to two miles. She had a strong carrying voice and I believe would have taken a prize in a modern radio hog calling contest.
All of this has disappeared from the scene now; even the hill on which the railroad tracks were said to have greased by her, had been graded out of existence. A strong and useful character; her type and kind have also disappeared.
A history of Greene County, published in 1884, mentions the first physicians in the county -- quote, "and old Mrs. DIXON, who in her way was a superior nurse. She knew how to use all the roots and herbs possessing medical properties, which grew in the woods and on the prairie and always kept a supply on hand. She presided at the entry into the world of many of the children of the township."
I have put in writing many incidents and recollections with copies for all that may be uninteresting to many, but they are mostly for my immediate family.

N.D. HUNT


March 7, 1945
608 N. Lorel Ave.
Chicago 44 Ill

WICK MILLER
P.O. Box 411
Oswego, Oregon

Dear WICK: --

As I have a distinct recollection of you in your parents (O.P. MILLER and DEBORAH INGERSOLL) home, I will introduce myself as the son of ROACH HUNT, and try to comply with your request to WALKER, who forwarded it an one of his own for the same information.
I have at different times in my life collected family data and your letter reawakened this interest. With the help of my daughter, ROOSEVE, I have delved into the past again and she has arranged the form, which I enclose, with some recollections and incidents and persons relating to the
DIXON-HUNT-INGERSOLL family, which I will inflict upon you whether or not. All will be impartially treated as to that part and I am in hopes that we will be able to trade you information for information of the WINES-INGERSOLL family. If you have any please forward.
My first effort was to trace the ownership of the INGERSOLL homestead, in Old Fairplay, Greene County. Greene County's records show the quarter section was entered or purchased at a Public Land sale by W.C. Field, who in 1841 transferred it to J.W. WINES, at which point the records hump to PETER
INGERSOLL, your Great Grandfather. There is record of your Grandfather purchasing the shares of the heirs of PETER. Your Grandfather improved buildings and farm and upon his death it was a well equipped and kept homestead farm. I enclose a snap taken of it in 1940, a sad reminder to me of the home and farm as I remember it. My first recollection was your Grandfather's (J. WICKLIFF INGERSOLL) funeral, held in the large parlor in the left side, or West end of the house, as shown in the picture, with my Grandmother (MARY INGERSOLL), his sister. I recall as the services progressed the mourning became audible, then louder and louder until I, a small boy, became affected in the same manner when my Grandmother pinched me and shut me up. Pinching must have been on both sides of the family as my Mother (SARAH ANNE GREGG DIXON) used the same method of discipline. This same Grandmother later, once caught me at the Linton Fair attending a striking machine (one of those that you got three strikes with a maul on a lever for a nickel and if you rang the bell at the top of the shaft you got a cigar). She elbowed through the crowd, nipped me by the ear and led me through the crowd away from such hellish business. (One really got a nickel's worth in swinging the maul and grunting). Later in the day I engaged in selling red synthetic lemonade from a rain barrel which she did not object to although the customers were all cheated. Your Grandfather died in Hot Springs, in case you do not know, and left the home and farmland of a well to do farmer, equipped with the best the period afforded to produce a comfortable living. The house shown in the snap was two stories both main and rear el, with a hall through the main building from the front to the rear porch. Large old fashioned fire places were built in each of the two large downstairs rooms -- living and parlor. In the fenced yard was a large tree with an extended limb for a chain swing, smoke house, wash house and a deep well. The well was covered by a large flag stone and the opening was housed in from the roof of which was suspended on a pulley, two "old oaken buckets," which hung in the well. To the West, left in the snap, was large orchard on a hill sloping to the East and South. On the West side of the hill was Indian burial mound built up of sand although the hill was of clay under the top soil. It was perhaps seventy five feet above the surrounding land when TIP and I played around an old excavation on the top.
My Father when a boy visiting his Grandfather (PETER INGERSOLL, JR.), remembered that the mound was wooded and that human bones had been taken out. A skull, he remembered, was wired to snap its jaw and jokes were played on visitors by placing it in a closet, operating the jaw with a string.
In about 1890 your Grandmother bought in Worthington, several Texas ponies and helped to introduce this dwarf breed into Greene County stock. Among them were two colts, one of which became TIP's riding pony, TIP was equipped with a suitable cowboy outfit and rode herd on the three or four old
bossies, running them to the barn at milking time, whooping and cracking a long blacksnake whip, driving your Grandmother to distraction and the cows to withholding their output. The other was broke to the family buckboard, but never was trusted like old Doc, ageing family horse who for a generation was
noted for his gentleness and cleanliness -- he slept on one side of his stall and used the opposite for all other purposes. I had the honor of being kicked on same day by TIP's pony, named Barney, and by the alleged family driving horse, Billy. The first by Barney was an entirely unprovoked assault, but in
the case of Billy he was probably aggrieved by my endeavors to hitch him to the buckboard.
It seems the HUNT, INGERSOLL AND DIXON families were confusedly mixed. My late brother-in-law, ED KNEPPER used to refer to that "damn HUNT-DIXON" family. Your Grandfather's cousin, RACHEL, daughter of PETER's brother, DANIEL, married Grandfather DIXON's (DANIEL GREGG DIXON) half brother, mentioned elsewhere. My Grandfather HUNT's name was NATHAN DIXON HUNT, but I can't identify what DIXON.
We find record of two PETER INGERSOLLS, one mentioned as a Major in the Revolutionary War and one as a Captain in the War of 1812. They migrated from New York State and PETER JR. and PETER SR. were enumerated in the Census of 1820 and 1830 in Greene County. Can you identify them from you Mother's (DEBORAH INGERSOLL-MILLER) records?
There were four brothers in the WINES family, apparently of Scotch-Irish stock moving into Southern Indiana with the vast stream flowing westward from Northern Ireland, but the first record we find of them is their arrival in Greene County from Kentucky in 1820. They could have been of other stock and their line of migration from the headwaters of the Ohio to Kentucky.
My Father regarded the WINES family highly, The original four settlers (brothers), were educated and successful men in all their undertakings and leaders in their communities. They are credited with the founding of the town of Linton, being perhaps early real estate promoters, as it is of record one
of them donated the ground for the Methodist Church. Their descendants numbering many hundred produced professional men, congressmen, judges, etc. I only recall one of them though he was an educated drunk.
You mention DALLAS. His Mother's people laid out Switz City. The family was English, the first in Indiana being T.J. EAST, North Carolina born, moving to Monroe County Indiana, then to Greene County. One son, THOMAS, was the Father of NETTIE, Mother of DALLAS.
TIP's (HARRISON C. INGERSOLL) other child, by the WARD girl, lives in Elgin, just west of here. I do not know her name, but my niece, ANNA BARBARA KNEPPER, has visited her.
This reference reminds to mention that you have relatives on you Father's (O.P. MILLER) side, whose sister married the son of old HENRY SWITZ, part of whose farm was laid out as Switz City. You had one cousin, JOHN, now dead, but he left a family.
The INGERSOLLS were unmistakable Whigs and Republicans, as evidenced by the number of given name of HARRISON, starting with your Grandfather's brother, TIP, a political given name honoring the first HARRISON President, shortened to Tip or Tippy as used by your Mother and Grandmother, an abbreviation of Tippecanoe, where Old General HARRISON made a good Indian out of Tecumseh's brother and made himself President. The political rallying cry of that campaign was "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too." The given name WICKLIFF was also a favorite for your family, as you know that it started with WICKLIFF WINES, brother of LEONARD WINES.
The SPENCER DIXON, to whom I have addressed a letter about the DIXONS, copy of which is enclosed, is the son of CARL (DIXON), the deceased son of CHARLES WESLEY (DIXON), son of DANIEL and MARY JANE (DIXON). The three mentioned seem to have inherited brains and ability from DANIEL and MARY, but SPENCER is the only one that has capitalised the common inheritance.
The incident you mention of my Father is typical. If you had pursued your request farther and asked him what was good, he probably would have told you that cold pie and navy beans contain all elements the body needs and who can say? He lived to be 72 years old on a very restricted diet, which doubtless did not include onions.
It is likely I have mentioned many incidents and individuals that have nothing to do with a family tree and may be boring, but you will pardon my desire to set down for my family, the events and characteristics of the participants, of the first and second generation before your time.
I will add some current information that might as well be recorded as of this date, of the living remnants of our common ancestry. There are four children of CHARLES W. alive -- Mrs. MAMIE CLAYWELL of Chicago. Mrs. KOCK of Colorado Springs. WALKER GASKINS and REED DIXON, Uncle Nate's boy. REED started life with an education and an inheritance just before the depression which wrecked his business and family life, from which he never recovered. I have an Aunt Nick, Mrs. HANNAH NEWMAN, age 83, living in Linton. Of the DIXON-INGERSOLLS, I can recall only your Mother's family, TIP's and the writer's.
Yours very truly,

NATHAN DIXON HUNT

[NI0014] <-- Hunt Family Bible, (Horatio and Anna D.) owned by Lucille HUNT ANDERSON in 1945. Copied by Rooseve Fern HUNT>

"Horatio and Anna Dixon were married July 23, 1874 in Dixon, Indiana. Witnessed by J.W. INGERSOLL and JOHN SNEIDER, signed by LEA FISHER.

<-- Letter of Ecla HUNT to Rooseve Fern HUNT, dated 02/07/1945>

"I remember visiting with my Grandfather (JOHN F. HUNT) at Switz City, Indiana, and we stayed all night at a Tavern and had pictures taken the next morning in front of the place. We still have the picture and across the front of the porch was painted 'Hunt's Tavern' and I think this was a nephew of my grandfather."

<-- Indianapolis News 09 March 1900>

"But the one thing that advertises Switz City more than anything else is "Hunt's Tavern." There is hardly a traveling man in the West but has heard of this noted hostelry, and the drummers who do business in this part of the country all try to spend the night and get breakfast at Hunt's Tavern. H. HUNT, the proprietor, never wears a collar, seldom shaves and covers his head with a great flapping hat. He is the town oracle, and is thoroughly posted on everything from matrimony to seven-up. Mr. HUNT has lived here all his life, has the history of every man and locality down to a dot; does not pretend to be eccentric and well liked by everyone. His "tavern" is the biggest thing in town. At the entrance of the large yard is a sign, "Gates Ajar." The rooms in the house are not numbered--they are named. These names I read on the doors of the sleeping rooms: Arizona, Boston, Cairo, Denver, England, France, Germany, Hamburg, Idaho, Jerico, Lincoln, Norway, Mexico and Kaintuck. I slept in Boston and enjoyed it. I do not know where Mr. HUNT got the idea, but it has brought him a great deal of advertising. He has no opposition. Mr. HUNT's principal source of information is the Indianapolis News, and he quotes that paper continually. What it says is fact--he is ready to put his money up on it.
"Mr. HUNT has invented a new game of solitaire that he is teaching to the hosts of traveling men who come to his tavern. He says that if he can get it introduced in the royal families of Europe he will feel that his work is well done. The game is played with cards and is said to be more interesting than any of the old games of solitaire.
"Close to where Switz City now stands was a famous deer-lick many years ago, and hunters used to come here from all parts of the East to shoot deer. When these animals were gone, the duck-hunters had great sport in this locality for many years. It was the hunting grounds of some of the most famous hunters of a few years ago. Every year the officers of the Pennsylvania railroad came here to shoot quail and grouse and forget all about their troubles. Landlord HUNT always entertains them, and he has a roomful of remembrances they have sent him.
"Not far from here was located the old town of Fair Play. Not a sign of the town is left now, but it was famous as river shipping point in its day. At one time it was suggested as the county seat, but Worthington was built, and the glory of Fair Play sickened and died. An Indian mound was located close to the old town, but that too, has almost disappeared. Mr. HUNT said that when he was boy he and some companions dug into the mound and found two skeletons of Indians and a number of stone and copper trinkets."

<-- "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" 1884>

"In Switz City, HUNT and Pegg started in business about 1879."

<-- Letter of Nathan Dixon HUNT to Wick MILLER, dated 03/07/1945>

"The incident you mentioned of my Father is typical. If you had pursued your request farther and asked him what was good, he probably would have told you that cold pie and navy beans contain all the elements the human body needs and who can say? He lived to be 72 years old on a very restricted diet, which doubtless did not include onions."

<-- Research of Rooseve Fern HUNT>

"HORATIO HUNT, born March 8, 1853 died February 2nd, 1925, aged 71 years, 10 months and 2 days.
"Born in Owen County Indiana, of the union of Dr. NATHAN DIXON HUNT and MARY INGERSOLL of which family there survives two sisters, Miss PHOEBE HUNT of Terre Haute, Indiana, and Mrs. HANNAH NEWMAN of Linton; an elder brother H.D. HUNT dying in 1919.
"The father of this family dying in the sixties, they removed to Dixon Station where the deceased united in marriage with ANNA DIXON in 1873. To this union there were born four children, two of which survived to maturity. Mrs. FANNIE HUNT KNEPPER, daughter died in Chicago in 1923, one grandchild, daughter of this daughter living in Chicago with N.D. HUNT his only surviving child. There also survives a nephew of the Mother, Mr. W.L. GASKINS of Chicago, who made his home with and was an intimate member of the family from his childhood. There are three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren of the family of N.D. HUNT living. The wife and mother preceded the husband eleven years.
"In early life Mr. HUNT joined the Methodist Church and at the time of his death was a member of this church at Linton. He was an Odd Fellow of some forty years standing having maintained his connection with Beehunter Lodge at Switz City since early in its history.
"Mr. HUNT resided in Switz City during the most active period of his life and it was here that he formed friendships and connection the recollections of which was remained with him and were highly valued during the remainder of his life, referring often to that period during his illness.
"His aim in life was service to his fellow citizens rather than the accumulation of property, having served in various townships, and county offices to the advantage of the public as attested by the number of sympathetic letters and appreciative comments received by his family from a wide circle of acquaintances."

(Eulogy for HORATIO PETER "ROACH" HUNT)

Headstone in Switz City Cemetery, outside Switz City, Indiana marks the gravesite of HORATIO and ANNA D. HUNT. This site was viewed on August 1, 1980 by descendants who included, MARTHA D. CHANEY, B. J. CHANEY, ROBERT J. CHANEY, and AMANDA and TERRI CHANEY. The single stone read as follows:

HUNT
ANNA D. HORATIO
Apr 18 1843 Mar 8 1858
Oct 11 1913 Feb 2 1925



THE STORY OF SWITZ CITY

Site Formerly Belonged To A Man Named Switz

Laid Out In 1870 by Hughes East--Surrounded by a Fine Farming Country--Big
Crops Raised

(Staff Correspondence Indianapolis News)

Switz City, Ind., March 9.--This town of 700 inhabitants is the eastern end of the Effingham branch of the Illinois Central, the western end of the old Bedford & Bloomington, now the Monon, and a station of considerable importance on the Indianapolis & Vincennes. It is seventy- eight miles Indianapolis, thirty-eight miles from Vincennes, six miles from Bloomfield, the seat of Greene county, and six miles from Worthington, and on a clear day the water tower at that place can be seen from the station platform at Switz City. The land on which the town was laid out in 1870 belonged to a man named Switz, who lived nearby, and whose descendants are still much in evidence here. This land was sold to Hughes East, formerly private secretary to Vice-President Hendricks. Mr. East laid it off in town lots, but there is no record that he ever made any great amount of money out of the deal. At the time East laid out the town, the Indianapolis & Vincennes was the only railroad here, and it was several years before Switz City amounted to more than a stop for slow trains. The Bedford & Bloomfield came here in 1876, and the train that is now the Illinois Central, some time later. They were both narrow gauge roads at the time, but changed owners and became standard. The properties are now in control of companies that will make them firstclass properties, and they will consequently be of great benefit to this place. The trains of the three roads will probably meet in one passenger station before long.
Switz City has a large flouring mill, built of brick, a saw mill and a tile factory. It has a couple of brick business blocks and several stores. The streets are gravel roads and the sidewalks are built of planks.
The town was once made the victim of a confidence game, but was not victimized as much as some of the surrounding towns. A number of years ago a smooth talking Yankee passed through this part of the country. He has a machine by which he claimed to be able to locate veins of coal. At Edwardsport he located a vein several feet thick which diminished to eight inches when mines went down. He got considerable money from the people there, but he did not do so well at Switz City. He was not paid so much for locating coal and when the prospectors found only an eight-inch vein they were not so greatly disappointed. There is no coal here of any consequence, but the town borders on coal fields at one side and the fields at the other.
Around Switz City is a magnificent farming country. The whole country around here was at one time a great swamp. Half a mile south of this town 16,000 acres were reclaimed by the Four Mile ditch. A short distance north of town and Lattes creek ditch drained 5,000 acres, and to the west, the Bee Hunter's marsh furnished a number of fine farms. This drained farm land produces good corn crops, also hay, oats and clover. The wheat product is almost a thing of the past in this part of the country. Last year some broom corn was raised, and the experiment was so much of a success that the broom corn industry promises to be a leading feature. Fine corn is raised at the rate of about eighty bushels an acre.
As might be expected, this is a great shipping point for grain. E. B. Martindale, of Indianapolis, this winter has shipped 25,000 bushels of corn. There is also considerable livestock shipped from Switz City.
While there is not a great deal of the place, the people here enjoy themselves. The Methodist and Baptist have good churches, the Odd Fellows are strong, and the Switz City Cornet Band furnishes a good deal of entertainment for the people.
But the one thing that advertises Switz City more than anything else is "Hunt's Tavern." There is hardly a traveling man in the West but has heard of this noted hostelry, and the drummers who do business in this part of the country all try to spend the night and get breakfast at Hunt's Tavern. H. HUNT, the proprietor, never wears a collar, seldom shaves and covers his head with a great flapping hat. He is the town oracle, and is thoroughly posted on everything from matrimony to seven-up. Mr. HUNT has lived here all his life, has the history of every man and locality down to a dot; does not pretend to be eccentric and well liked by everyone. His "tavern" is the biggest thing in town. At the entrance of the large yard is a sign, "Gates Ajar." The rooms in the house are not numbered--they are named. These names I read on the doors of the sleeping rooms: Arizona, Boston, Cairo, Denver, England, France, Germany, Hamburg, Idaho, Jerico, Lincoln, Norway, Mexico and Kaintuck. I slept in Boston and enjoyed it. I do not know where Mr. HUNT got the idea, but it has brought him a great deal of advertising. He has no opposition.
Mr. HUNT's principal source of information is the Indianapolis News, and he quotes that paper continually. What it says is fact--he is ready to put his money up on it.
Mr. HUNT has invented a new game of solitaire that he is teaching to the hosts of traveling men who come to his tavern. He says that if he can get it introduced in the royal families of Europe he will feel that his work is well done. The game is played with cards and is said to be more interesting than any of the old games of solitaire.
Close to where Switz City now stands was a famous deer-lick many years ago, and hunters used to come here from all parts of the East to shoot deer. When these animals were gone, the duck-hunters had great sport in this locality for many years. It was the hunting grounds of some of the most famous hunters of a few years ago. Every year the officers of the Pennsylvania railroad came here to shoot quail and grouse and forget all about their troubles. Landlord HUNT always entertains them, and he has a roomful of remembrances they have sent him.
Not far from here was located the old town of Fair Play. Not a sign of the town is left now, but it was famous as river shipping point in its day. At one time it was suggested as the county seat, but Worthington was built, and the glory of Fair Play sickened and died. An Indian mound was located close to the old town, but that too, has almost disappeared. Mr. HUNT said that when he was boy he and some companions dug into the mound and found two skeletons of Indians and a number of stone and copper trinkets.

(This article appeared in the Indianapolis News dated March 9, 1900. It
included a picture of Hunt's Tavern.)


LANDMARK IN SWITZ CITY IS REMINDER OF OLD DAYS by Eva M. Holmes

A landmark In Switz City which is a reminder of the changes that have come to this small town because of improved modes of travel is the Hunt Hotel, built by HORATIO HUNT in the nineties and successfully operated by he and family for a number of years.
The building of twenty-two rooms was in a grove of maple trees with a white archway at the entrance to the grounds bearing the inscription, "Gates Ajar." With its wide shaded verandas, comfortable chairs and hammocks, it was truly an inviting, homelike place.
The first hotel operated by Mr. HUNT was located on the adjoining block and was built by James M. Martin more than fifty years ago. Business increased and it became necessary to build another hotel and at times both of these as well as a cottage owned by Mr. HUNT were filled to capacity.

CHARACTERISTIC HOSPITALITY

During these years it was patronized by the traveling public, not alone because of the excellence of the food and service, but also because of the spirit of hospitality which was characteristic of the HUNT family. Salesmen, known in those days as "drummers," unable to reach home for the week-end, if in driving distance would arrange to spend the time here. Being in the horse and buggy days the livery stables were well patronized, as drummers depended on hiring a conveyance (usually a team and buggy) to call on merchants in adjoining towns.
Switz City being the terminal of a branch of the Monon known as the B. & B. (Bedford & Bloomfield), also the I. & I. S., some of the trainmen with their families made their homes at the hotel and were like a large family. Mr. HUNT, being an expert at cards and checkers, and the daughter, Miss FANNIE, an accomplished musician, there was always entertainment.
Instead of the rooms being numbered they were given the names of states. At one visit one might sleep in Idaho and the next time in Florida. The temperature, however, was not noticeably different.
Meals were very reasonable in price, usually 25 cents, less, if by the week. "Abe Martin" once said a drummer got in bad with his company by charging 50 cents for a meal in Switz City.
During the prosperous days for the hotel the I. and I. S. was purchased by the Illinois Central and extended into Indianapolis. The B. & B. was discontinued. This caused the removal of the trainmen. Later the HUNT family moved elsewhere and what was once the hospitable home for families and travelers became an apartment.
Today, the Vandalia and Illinois Central railroads run through the town, and paved Highways 54 and 67 have taken the place of the gravel roads of former years, but with automobiles this has been the means of making the hotels in larger towns easily accessible. While conditions improved in most
respects by modern traveling facilities it has meant finis to this once thriving place -- Hunt's Hotel.

(From newspaper clipping -- probably Indianapolis -- pencil dated "1937")



Copy of HUNT Bible in possession of Mrs LUCILLE HUNT ANDERSON -- July 1945

MARRIAGE PAGE

HORATIO HUNT and ANNA D. LOCKWOOD

date July 23, 1874

at Dixon, Indiana


Presence of J. W. INGERSOLL signed by LEA FISHER
JOHN SNEIDER


Births........ Deaths.......

NATHAN D. -- June 21, 1875
Infant Son -- August 29, 1876
ELLMAY -- July 27, 1877 December 13, 1889
12 years 4 months & 6 days
FANNIE FERN -- March 1st, 1882
Infant Daughter February 2, 1886


Sources: <4> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Wick Miller, dated 07 Mar 1945
<5> "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" -- 1884
<10> Letter of Ecla Hunt to Rooseve Fern Hunt, dated 07 Feb 1945
<11> Hunt family Bible, (Horatio and Anna D.) owned by Lucille Hunt Anderson -- 1945 -- copied by Rooseve Fern Hunt
<21> Gravesite visit, Switz City, IN -- 01 Aug 1980 by Robert J. Chaney
<22> Indianapolis News -- 09 Mar 1900

[NI0016] <-- Research of Rooseve Fern Hunt>

The family Bilble of JOHN F., brother of NATHAN DIXON, records the birthplace of the family in Preble County, Ohio. In "Biographical Memoirs of Greene County, Indiana with Reminisences of Pioneer Days, Vol 3, 1908," it states that NATHAN DIXON HUNT was born in Coshocton County, Ohio. Copy obtained from Miss ANNA POUCHER, Genealogy Librarian at Indianapolis, Indiana.

<-- "Clay and Owen Counties, Indiana" 1885 Chicago Public Library>

"Stockton, Owen County, was surveyed in the year 1852 and christened Davidsburg, a name it bore until 1854, at which time it was changed to Stockton. The first store was owned by JAMES COLE who did business for a period of 18 months with a small stock of groceries and whisky. The next merchant was J.J. HOCHSLETTLER who dealt in general merchandise for about two years at the end of which time the stock was purchased by STEPHEN HOWLAND, who in turn sold it to ISSAC WALTERS and remained in the village three years when he disposed of the stock to NATHAN HUNT." (page 730)

"Village of Lancaster, Marian Township, Owen County, was laid out in 1851. The following medical gentlemen have practiced the art of healing.....Dr. NATHAN HUNT." (page 746)

<-- Letter of Ecla HUNT to Rooseve Fern HUNT, dated 02/07/1945>

"NATHAN DIXON HUNT came to Owen County, Indiana with his parents and sisters and brothers from Preble County. His brother JOHN F. HUNT who was working on the Wabash and Erie Canal in Vermillion County, Indiana, talked his family into coming to Indiana. When they arrived the canal work was farther along, so they settled in Owen County near Bowling Green."

<-- "Biographical Memoirs of Greene County, Indiana With Reminiscences of Pioneer Days" Vol 3 / 1908 Indianapolis Library

"The HUNT family is descended from Irish ancestors who first settled in the Eastern states. Dr. NATHAN DIXON HUNT was born in Coshocton County, Ohio. The family lived in Sullivan, Owen and Clay Counties. NATHAN D. was a physician, but the latter part of his life was spent in the merchantile business in Middleton and Stockton, Owen County, Indiana. Although he died at the early age of 37, then living on a farm in Owen County, his wife never remarried. His widow died at the age of 74 years. They had a family of seven children of whom four are now living -- namely HARRISON and HORATIO, who have an office in Linton, Mrs. HANNAH NEWMAN, widow living in Linton; employed at the Post Office. And PHOEBE E., unmarried, living in Terre Haute, manager of a boarding house at the college. Two children died in childhood and one later in youth."

<-- Letter from Hannah HUNT NEWMAN to Nathan Dixon HUNT, dated 02/06/1945>

"Father (NATHAN DIXON HUNT) had a store in Middleton. He also practiced medicine there and was Post Master."


Sources: <10> Letter of Ecla Hunt to Rooseve Fern Hunt, dated 07 Feb 1945
<12> Hunt family Bible, (John F.) owned by Ecla Hunt -- 1945 -- copied by Rooseve Fern Hunt
<15> "Biographical Memoirs of Greene County, Indiana With Reminiscences of Pioneer Days" -- Vol 3 -- 1908 -- Indianapolis Library
<17> "Clay and Owen Counties, Indiana" -- 1885 -- Chicago Public Library B3222
<19> Letter from Hannah Hunt Newman to Nathan Dixon Hunt, dated 06 Feb 1945

[NI0018] <-- Letter of Ecla HUNT to Rooseve Fern HUNT, dated 02/07/1945>

"My Grandfather (JOHN F. HUNT) came from Eaton, Preble County, Ohio. I remember my Grandfather saying his family hailed from New Jersey and called himself a Jersey Irishman."

"There are two Granddaughters and a Grandson of ELIZABETH and WILLIAM CAMPBELL now living in Bowling Green, that I know quite well. They know where the graves of DAVID and MARY HUNT are located. I can remember my Grandfather made a trip down there from Dana, and had stones erected on their graves. He drove down in a horse and buggy. The cemetery is a small obsolete one in a corner of a field near Bowling Green."

"JOHN F. HUNT came to Vermillion County to work on a canal being built along the Wabash and as I remember the story, he liked the country so well he talked the rest of his family into coming. By the time they came the canal work was farther along and they settled in Owen County near Bowling
Green." <10>

The Wabash and Erie Canal was started in 1837 in Owen County. Work stopped in 1939 and started again in 1945. The Canal was completed in 1849. <1>

"I believe that WILLIAM CAMPBELL married two sisters of my Father (NATHAN DIXON HUNT)." <10>


Sources: <1> The research of Rooseve Fern Hunt
<10> Letter of Ecla Hunt to Rooseve Fern Hunt, dated 07 Feb 1945

[NI0036] Social security number: 452-12-4872 was issued August 6, 1937.

HONORABLE DISCHARGE FROM THE UNITED STATES ARMY
To All Who It May Concern:
This is to Certify, That JACK C. CHANEY #1012676
Private 1st Class, Troop 'A' 14th Calvary
THE UNITED STATES ARMY
As a Testimonial of Honest And Faithful Service,
Is Hereby Honorably Discharged from the Military Service
Of the United States of America by Reason of Expiration Of
Service Term Under Prov. of Letter A.G.O. dated Aug 25, '19.
Said JACK C. CHANEY was born in Hamilton County, in the State
of Texas. When enlisted he was 21 years of age
and by occupation a farmer. He had blue eyes, lt. brown hair,
M fair complexion, and was 5 feet 7 inches in height.
Given under my hand at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas this 24th
day of September, one thousand nine hundred and nineteen.
(signed by) L.J. Fleming
Colonel 14th Calvary
Commanding

(Stamp appearing in lower left hand corner of document reads:)
FORT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS
SEP 21 1919
PAID IN FULL 98.25


ENLISTMENT RECORD
Name: JACK C. CHANEY Grade: Private 1st Class
Enlisted: January 22, 1918, at Ft Sam Houston, Texas
Serving in first enlistment period at date of discharge.
Prior service: None
Noncommissioned officer: App. Cpl. Apr 1, 1919 per R.S.O. #59
and rd. to pvt per R.S.O. #149 Aug 6 '19.
Marksmanship, gunner qualification or rating: Mm. May 12, 1919
per R.G.O. #42 dated July 8 '19.
Horsemanship: Very Good
Battles, engagements, skirmishes, expeditions: None
Knowledge of any vocation: Farmer
Wounds received in service: None
Physical condition when discharged: Good
Typhoid Prophylaxis completed April 17, 1918
Married or single: Single
Character: Excellent
Remarks: Service, Honest and Faithful. Service in Troop "A" 14th Cav from
Jan. 18, 1918 to date of discharge. No A.W.O.L.
or absence under G.O. #31, 1912 and G.O. #45, 1914.
Soldier entitled to travel pay to Gorman Texas.
Signature of soldier: (JACK C. CHANEY)
(signed by) John H. Irving
1st Lieut, 14th Cavalry
Commanding Troop "A"

(Stamp in lower left corner reads)

M.K.&T. of T.
--DEPOT--
SEP 24 '19
San Antonio
D--Tex--D


The wedding invitation of JACK and CLARA reads:

Mr. and Mrs. J.C. SPARKS
announce the marriage of their daughter
CLARA to Mr. JACK C. CHANEY
Saturday, March Twenty Sixth
at 8:30 p.m.
Nineteen hundred and twenty seven
Lueders, Texas



His obituary was as follows:

Services for JACK C. CHANEY, 78, of Rockdale are slated at 4 p.m. today
in Sanders Funeral Home Chapel. The Rev. N.C. Thomas, associate pastor of the
First United Methodist Church will officiate.
Burial will be at Resthaven Memorial Park.
Services for CHANEY also were held at 10 a.m. Tuesday in Philips and
Luckey Funeral Home Chapel in Rockdale. Officiating were the Rev. Matt
Chambers, pastor of St. John's United Methodist Church in Rockdale, and the
Rev. Jmaes Mitchell, pastor of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Rockdale.
CHANEY died at 10 a.m. Sunday in Richard's Memorial Hospital following a
lengthy illness.
He lived in Lubbock from 1943 to 1965 when he moved to Rockdale. While
living in Lubbock, he was employed by a bowling alley (The Lubbock Bowling
Club).
Survivors include his wife, CLARA; a son, B.J. of Colville, Wash.; two
sisters, Mrs. IRENE MORRIS of Granbury and Mrs. IDA HOOKER of Ft. Worth; and
two grandchildren.

(From The Lubbock Avalanch Journal, Lubbock, Texas--March 19, 1975.)

[NI0038] Christopher Columbus Chaney was born in 1853 in Green Forest, Carroll County, Arkansas. He married Mary Frances Felton in 1877. The ceremony was held in Mary's parents' home in Green Forest. He came to Texas in 1883 to get escape problems with his father and sister, Sarah Jane. He had heard that there were homestead lands. First he lived in Hamilton County, Texas, then moved to Gorman where, along with Caleb Martin and Robert Sims, was one of the first settlers around Gorman, Eastland County, Texas. His homestead was at Jewell, several miles south of Eastland. In the late 1890's he was licensed as a Methodist preacher. He was an extremely respected man who spoke and appeared to be very well educated. His wife could not read nor write. The Methodist Bishop of Texas was known to visit with him.
Mary Frances died in 1930. Christopher Columbus died in 1935. Both were buried in Gorman.


Reverse Index of Deeds, Eastland County, Texas

Bk -- Pg Instrument Filing Date Grantee Grantor Instrument Date
41 - 114 W-Deed 03-04-1901 CC Chaney OA Fike et-ux 09-05-1899
47 - 312 W-Deed 09-21-1902 CC Chaney HH Weatheman 11-20-1901
48 - 474 Rev/VL 09-21-1902 CC Chaney JR Johnson 11-18-1902
63 - 464 SWDeed 05-16-1907 CC Chaney GW Wood 07-23-1906
65 - 116 Rev/VL 05-16-1907 CC Chaney Baxter Bennett 11-01-1906
69 - 386 W-Deed 09-09-1909 CC Chaney EW Kimble et-ux 12-08-1909
73 -480 Rev/VL 12-09-1909 CC Chaney EW Kimble 12-08-1909


"Christopher Colombus Chaney migrated from Arkansas to Texas, settling first in Hamilton County and then in Eastland County. He was a farmer and a Methodist Preacher.
" In his capacity as a preacher he was once attending a meeting in Texas. There was, at this gathering, another preacher who thought himself somewhat above the others. At some point in the debates he the statement that when the Lord hit him, he hit him so hard that he knocked the taste for liquor right out of him. Christopher commented at that point, that the Lord hadn't hit him quite that hard.
"This comment from a man who was quite reserve in his dealings with others. He did not allow idle talk and gossip around his home. And he did not touch liquor.
" In his youth he had come to Texas from Arkansas to see what opportunities might exist. Upon his return he approached William Robert Felton concerning marriage to his daughter, Mary Francis Felton. At that time William gave his consent with the proviso that Christopher never take a drink of liquor. He agreed and they were married. He was 23 and she was 16. It is said that no one ever saw him take a drink throughout the rest of his life. Indeed, when once visited in Texas by William Robert Felton, his abstinance came into question when William asked if he would have a drink with him. Christopher reminded him of his pledge and stated that he would not have a drink. Felton tried to pass the matter over, by excusing him from his promise based on the years passed, maturity and security acheived. Christopher still did not have a drink.
"The decision to leave Arkansas was apparently made in response to a situation which existed in Arkansas concerning his father, Robert. He apparently was an alcoholic who had to be rescued more than by Christopher.
"Christopher wore a mustache most of his life. It is said that he shaved it off once and could not come to terms with the vast expanse of upper lip revealed by its abscense. He regrew the mustache and it was never removed again."

-- Conversation with Billy Jack Chaney -- October 03, 1987


Christopher C Chaney appears in the Pre-1908 Homestead and Cash Entry Patents land records as follows:
CHANEY CHRISTOPHER C Boone 8 21N 19W 0 1901/02/20
CHANEY CHRISTOPHER C Boone 8 21N 19W 120 1901/02/20
CHANEY CHRISTOPHER C Carroll 27 18N 23W 40 1872/09/10

Sources: 1. Marriage license for George Stroud and "Annie" Chaney. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
2. Family Record pages from family bible of Christopher Columbus Chaney and Mary Chaney. Photocopies in possession of A. Jane Berry.
3. Letter from Ida True Chaney to A. Jane Berry.
4. Newspaper clipping from The Gorman Progress, Gorman, Eastland County, Texas. Circa 3 May 1927. Copy provided by Ida True Chaney to A. Jane Berry.
5. Texas Death Certificate for Christopher Columbus Chaney. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
6. Texas Death Certificate for Mary Frances (Felton) Chaney. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
7. Gravestones in Gorman Cemetery, Gorman, Eastland County, Texas. Photographs in possession of A. Jane Berry.

[NI0040] Robert "Bob" Chaney was born in the late 1820's, probably in Kentucky. Very little is known of his family. His father has not been adequately identified. It is thought that his name might have also been Robert, yet, there are some indications that his name might have been William. His mother was probably named Sarah. Only two brothers are known, Hezekiah and "Bud" who was evidently named Ninevah. It is possible that there was a sister named Jane.
Bob married Mary Ann Skaggs in the 1840's. Mary Ann was blonde while Bob was dark haired. They had several children before she died around 1868. In 1869, Bob married Margaret Lewis. They had one daugher, Arminda D., before Margaret died.
Evidently, in 1875, Bob served a few months as a Texas Ranger. In 1877, Bob married a widow, Eliza A. Morrison Sims. She lived on her farm about fifteen miles from Bob's place. (In 1875, Bob had purchased forty acres of farmland from the state. The land had been forfeited by the previous owner
for payment of unpaid taxes.) Initially, Bob lived with here on her farm while his children remained on his farm.
There is a tradition that Bob did some moonshining.
Bob died in 1891 and was buried in Rule Cemetery, Rule, Carroll County, Arkansas, where Mary Ann and Margaret had been buried. His brother "Bud" was buried there as well as two children of his brother, Hezekiah. Eliza was to be buried there when she died in 1920.

[NI0042] The identity of the father of Robert "Bob" and Hezekiah Chaney is unverified although there is some indication that his name was either William or Robert D. Chaney. The 1860 census of Carroll County, Arkansas, records the household of Hezekiah, age 21. Included are his wife, Frances Chaney, age 16,
and two other individuals: Sarah Chaney, age 65, born in North Carolina, and Nenviah (sic) Chaney, age 18, age 18. This would have been shortly after Hezekiah, "Kye", married Frances. It seems probable that Sarah is his mother and Nenviah (probably an attempt to record Ninevah) is his brother known as
"Bud" who died in 1863.
A story passed down in the family of Robert "Bob" Chaney, recounted by his grand-daughter, Reecie Stroud Martin, tells how Bud "was killed during the Civil War. To escape fighting on either side he hid out in a cave. On coming out for food, he was ambushed by bushwackers. The women buried his remains in the Rule Cemetery, Rule, Arkansas."

[NI0059] It is believed that ARCHIBALD SIMPSON served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The name "SIMSON" appears on a monument erected by the Daughters of the American Revolution, at the courthouse in Princeton, Gibson County, Indiana.

[NI0072] "WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON was the third son of BENJAMIN, the Signer (of the Declaration of Independence) and three times governor of Virginia, and ELIZABETH BASSETT, having been born in Berkeley on the James River, 9 February 1773. Having been a senior in a medical course, he left school at his father's death, 1791, and was soon appointed ensign in the First Army, with
assignment to General Wayne. He showed great valor at Fallen Timbers, was promoted to captaincy, and make commandant at Fort Washington.
"Vincennes (Indiana) seems to have become a rendezvous, rather than a point of activity, for foreign agents. The Spaniards wanted to gain a foothold in the fur fields; the British wanted, above all, the government to fail, and were seeking to separate the West by breaking the connection, Kentucky; and the French sought to roil the Kentuckians into a war against Spain that might again ally France and the United States. Into the midst of these antagonist the twenty-two-year-old HARRISON was thrown, with the task of saving the Union by staying the movements of these Americans, and intercepting the shipment of arms.
"On 22 November 1795, HARRISON married ANNE SYMMES, the daughter of the wealthy judge, JOHN CLEVE SYMMES of Ohio, and made his home on the Symmes Estate at North Bend. They had ten children.
"When Winthrop Sargent was named governor of Mississippi Territory, HARRISON succeeded him as Secretary of the Northwest Territory. In the following year, he was elected its delegate to Congress, and on 13 May 1800 became governor of the new Indiana Territory. He was also the government's
Indian agent, and concluded thirteen treaties with the Indians acquiring millions of acres for Congress. After his victory at Tippecanoe, he was soon appointed Commander-in- chief of the Army of the West in the War of 1812. He urged a navy upon the Great Lakes, and the splendid victory of Commodore Perry
thereby became a matter of record. Six days later, General HARRISON captured the British forces under General Proctor, and forced his Indian allies led by Tecumseh, to battle. Tecumseh was killed, and the Indians were routed. HARRISON's victories gave the United States undisputed claims to the lakes,
except Ontario.
HARRISON was, in turn, congressman, state senator, presidential elector, and U.S. Senator from Ohio; he was U.S. Minister to Columbia, and, having returned in 1830, retired to North Bend. But in 1835, a most bristling, and stupendous celebration for the time, at the old Battleground of Tippecanoe
aroused a national popularity that, finally, carried him to the White House. He was the first of four to be elected President of the United States by fewer popular votes than his opponents. He died in office, intestate, thirty-one days after his inauguration, 4 April 1841, and was interred at North Bend,
Ohio.
"On the day of his arrival in Vincennes, he swore in Chief Justice, William Clark; and Clark, in turn, swore him in office as governor. On the next day, 12 January, he met with the other two judges, and swore them in their offices. Those were the days of strong political feelings, and differences, and to safeguard his own position, he appointed the Secretary of the Territory, John Gibson, Justice of the Peace, Recorder of Knox County, and Judge of the Quarter Sessions, within three days. It was not diplomatic. And on February 3rd, the governor proclaimed the boundaries for Clark County; sold 32 licenses to traders; and purchased the site of his manse.
"The first local ferry licenses granted by the authority of the governor of the Northwest Territory were the two granted to Robert Buntin, 23 June 1796, 'for the convenience of Knox County.' It is believed that he may have operated the first ferry here (Vincennes, Indiana) across the Wabash River, and Joshua Harbin, on White River.
"The first ferry licenses granted by the authority of the governor of Indiana Territory was in 1801."

"It is not known where Governor HARRISON and family lived during the time his home was being constructed. But there are certain indications that he lived in the house near the southwest corner of First and Broadway streets (in Vincennes, Indiana), which (Francis) Vigo later lost to his creditors in
Detroit."

"Shortly after his arrival, Governor HARRISON purchased forty-nine acres, being bounded by the river and old Elm Road, and from Hart to Locust streets, and planned to build on it in the following spring, 1802. But Vigo did not have a clear title to this land, and it was not cleared until the middle of
1802. On 10 February 1801, Father Rivet wrote that the governor offered to take him to his home in Ohio for a recreational trip, and to bring him back with him and his family. Since there was no house available for the governor's residence, Mr. Vigo, having built a house on the river bank, near
First and Broadway streets, and thinking it elaborate enough for the governor, offered him the use of it. It seems probable that the governor made use of it. Vigo lost his property, and Mr. William Burch is said to have purchased the house, moved the part containing the exquisite flooring to his home sight on Fourth and Buntin streets, where it burned out. He used to say it was the governor's office.
"The governor moved into his mansion in 1804. He seems to have had a zest for grouse, a game bird that ranked between the quail and pheasant in size and taste, and he called his place Grouseland. It is well preserved today by the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
"Grouseland, or the Harrison Manse, may be called an interpretation of Georgian architecture. He. undoubtedly, incorporated his own ideas, and the west curved wall, or wide bay, in the Council Chamber, or Governor's Office, is of particular interest. Today it contains some of its original furniture, and some of the personal possessions of Francis Vigo, as well as a few oil portraits of local residents of the period.
"The age of the building, and the early deaths of many of the Harrison family occupants, have made it susceptible to many tales and minute interpretations, but, quite generally, the trained guides will indicate fancies from fact.
"Governor HARRISON sold the old Jean B. d'Armour Donation Lot of 400 acres, which he owned, on 8 September 1804; to Samuel Thompson for $1,200.00. Mr. Thompson did burn the bricks for Grouseland, and the farm may have been given in settlement for the accounts, but the farm's present texture of soil
dos not show it to have been good brick material."

"Governor HARRISON proclaimed the Indiana Territory had 5,000, or more, males, and had thereby reached the second stage of its development; an election of legislators was mandatory. The election occurred (on 9 July 1805)."

"On 20 September (1805), an Indian treaty at Grouseland obtained Indian land in the southeastern part of Indiana, whereas another treat there, 30 December, gave the balance of the counties of Crawford, Edwards, and all of Jasper, Effingham, Clay, Richland, and Wayne counties in Illinois to the United States.
"And, of course, what was most pertinent to the development of the country, was the first of the above treaties, making three in all at Grouseland, on 21 August. At this treaty with Delaware, Miami, Pottawatomy, Eel River, and Ouias tribes, the United States got land that gave a free roadway to Cincinnati, Ohio, as well as to Louisville, both going by way of French Lick on the Buffalo Trail.
"Also in 1805, the Reverend Thomas Clelland visited Grouseland. Mrs. HARRISON claimed membership in the Presbyterian church, and it was a great pleasure for her to invite her friends and fellow citizens to Grouseland, where a minister of her church would preach in the council chamber. The
Harrison family claimed the Episcopal church."

"Soon after Governor HARRISON arrived here he was concerned about the education of his children, as were Judges Clark and VanderBurgh, and John Rice Jones. These men established a small school, that they afterwards called Jefferson Academy, the intent of which was to make an entry for federal
assistance for general education in the territory. They knew that Ohio had gotten a land grant for that purpose. It was nearly five years later, 10 October 1806, that the Congress granted some 23,000 acres in Gibson County to what was 'to be called and known by the name, or style, of Vincennes University.'"

"A smart, typical specimen of fine Indian manhood was Tecumseh, who with his brother, a self-styled prophet, had set up an Indian agency at 'The Prophet's Town,' at the mouth of the Tippecanoe River, above Lafayette, for reclaiming the land for the Indians.
"The Prophet had called on the governor a few times, but in August 1810 Tecumseh arrived for a conference. The governor offered his enclosed garden on the river bank as a place for the council with Tecumseh and his seventy warriors, but the Indian preferred the native setting, the walnut grove
towards the village.
"The council lasted three days."

"At this point he had challenged the government, and HARRISON felt obliged to answer, or, at least, explain matters. He explained the nature of the treaties, and the bill of sale. The governor defended the terms of the treaties as being legitimate, fair, and uniform. It was at this point that Tecumseh cried out: 'He lies.' Joseph Barron, the ablest of interpreters, endeavored to have Tecumseh qualify the statement. The chief refused, but the warriors understood him, and moved in to support Tecumseh, and there was a moment of intense expectation. HARRISON's guards, made up of the army, and armed citizens, came to attention, but the governor bade them be at rest, and terminated the council.
"Now on the next morning, it appears, through the persuading of Barron, that Tecumseh presented and apology to the governor, and asked for another day's council. Both were granted by the governor. On this fourth day, to justify his insulting remark to HARRISON, Tecumseh said that a white Indian
agent up north, and a local land speculator, had declared the treaties to be fraudulent. The governor then explained that the treaties were the dealings between a red chief and a white chief, and what was good enough for one ought to be good enough for the other, but, nevertheless, he would refer the entire
matter to the Big Chief in Washington. Tecumseh was not placated, and the council ended. The next day, Tecumseh and his warriors returned north.
"Now, some of the Old French handed down their views on the council, and contended that Tecumseh's shouting that the governor 'lied' was no more than the Indian's crude way of denying that the treaties were just for the Indians, that it was a matter for each side to judge. Nevertheless, the close friends agreed with HARRISON that the 'cold' war might become a 'hot' one."

"In September the governor made the treaty with Delaware, Pottawatomy, Miami, and Eel River Indians."

"In June 1811, the government sent a boat laden with annuity salt for the Delaware and Pottawatomy Indians up north, which stopped to make some good will gifts to The Prophet."

"Tecumseh was encouraged by this gift, and thought that the federal government was weakening in its hold on Indian lands. He came down to see the governor in July, and told him that more and more Indians were bent on reclaiming their lands. He left Vincennes, and went down the river. This
council scene aroused the citizens to send resolutions to Washington calling for the subduing of Tecumseh and The Prophet."

"When HARRISON saw that Tecumseh went to the south, he decided to ask the War Department for soldiers. It was possible that Tecumseh could stir up many tribes throughout the south against the whites, or, at least, the number or warriors at Prophet's Town could get beyond an easy handling. He though that The Prophet should be shown, by the presence of many men in arms, that the United States intended to keep the lands that were believed to have been purchased legally from the Indian chiefs, and that, it the numbers were not convincing, he would accept their challenge to do battle. The War Department accepted his proposal, but urged a victory without war.
"The governor authorized a call for civilian volunteers, and left Vincennes at the head of just over 900 men in arms. About 250 were U.S. Regulars, 60 from Old Kentucky, and the balance were from Indiana Territory. These left from here and from Fort Knox II on 26 September 1811.
"There is but little reason to doubt that they took the old Ouiatanon Trail, which was on the second plane in the Wabash River valley, just west of the Donation Lands as marked on the Government Survey of 1804. The day's average march was about ten miles. The first night's camp is not placed in
any diary. Tradition places it at 'the Harrison Rock and springs' southwest of present Busseron; another places it up Maria Creek at the Apraw Trail. The other camps were on the Gill-Shakertown crossing at Busseron Creek, the Big Springs neat Merom Bluffs, a place whose name I cannot recall, then at, or near, Vigo in present Vigo County, finally camping at an old Indian battleground site just above Terre Haute, where the army arrived on 2 October. It is remembered that the trail was not wide, nor was it direct."

"The army arrived within view of Prophet's Town on 6 November.
"The Indians were expecting him, and sent a peace delegation asking for a council on the morrow. Squaws and children were seen in the town, and all indications were that no battle was contemplated. The offer was accepted but the governor had his own thoughts. He had learned that the Indians were want to attack just at the break of day.
"He ordered camp set on the site chosen by his aide, Marston G. Clark. It was on a height on the banks of the Burnett Creek, surrounded by lowlands. In Indian country there was no safe place for a camp. The men were ordered to sleep on their arms; camp fires were lit; it began to rain.
"The governor had also learned from General Wayne that a commander should never be caught sleeping in Indian country. He may, or may not, have slept, but it is recorded that he was pulling on his boots at 4 a.m., at which moment, surprising to all, a few shots were heard, then the fiendish yells of
the savages blasted the night's air. His soldiers were aroused to action, camp fires were snuffed, and the battle was in pitch darkness. Led by Chiefs Winamac, Stone Eater, and White Loon, the Indians made fierce attacks. HARRISON was in the midst of his men directing, closing the lines, and placing
units in a more effective defense. Colonel Abraham Owen was shot dead at the
side of HARRISON."

"It was a short, but deadly, battle. 62 Americans died, and 126 were wounded, many of whom died later on, enroute to, or at Vincennes. The Indian losses were counted at half that number.
"After the battle, the governor thought Indian reinforcements might yet come for a counter-attack. He ordered his men to bury the dead, nurse the wounded, and fortify the camp for another night out. But none was allowed to sleep.
"The next day, the men entered the town. All the Indians were gone, and so were HARRISON's beeves. Horse flesh was on the daily menu until the army reached Fort Harrison."

"On the 18th, HARRISON arrived at Old Bosseron in Sullivan County (where most of the remaining troops were discharged.)"

"There was a furor in Vincennes. (Many) were indignant over the loss of so many prominent men at Tippecanoe and the ineffectiveness of the battle, and felt that HARRISON should have spent more time to drill and train the volunteer units. Regardless of the local controversy, HARRISON's militiamen from all over stood by him, and it was their help that, later on, gave him the highest rank men can bestow on a fellowman, the President of the United States.
"On 24 September 1812, Governor HARRISON was appointed Commander-in-chief with the title of General, in the Northwest Army of the United States. He resigned as governor, and took to the field; he never resided in Vincennes after that."

"It was the first governor, now a Congressman from Ohio, WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, who introduced the resolution in Congress that admitted Indiana as the 19th State in the Union as of December 11, 1816."

"In 1835, Colonel Johnson was bent on becoming President. At Indianapolis there was to be an anniversary celebration of the Battle of the Thames, and he was to be the hero.
Someone on the committee thought that the presence of General HARRISON at this celebration might enhance the greatness of their hero-candidate. The invitation was sent. But the General felt that he had to tell the truth of matters. Johnson had done nothing on the battlefield except to carry out the
general's orders, and the victory belonged to none but the American army. The good old boys who had fought so bravely for our country under HARRISON at Tippecanoe and on the Thames were now recognized by all the people. There was an almost fanatical regard for them, and they recognized that any of their greatness came from their brilliant general. Why should he not be the next President?
"Martin VanBuren defeated HARRISON that year, but the old general came back at the next convention and carried away the nomination that place him in the White House as the ninth President of the greatest nation in the world.
"But the President was too old, and too happy. The President's Ball continued on and on till the break of day. He would not leave those happy folks; it laid him low. It was a cold, wet night, and pneumonia took him from the land of the living in one short month after him inauguration."

(From "Old Vincennes" by Joseph Henry Vanderburgh Somes)

"From early manhood, HARRISON had been an officeholder of an office seeker. Son of BENJAMIN HARRISON (a signer of the Declaration of Independence), educated at Hampden Sydney College in Virginia, WILLIAM HENRY had cast in his lot with the West. He had been secretary of the Northwest
Territory, a Representative and Senator to the Congress of the United States, and minister to Columbia. Still more to the point of popular politics, he had defeated Indians at the battle of Tippecanoe and had commanded American troops in the War of 1812. In the evening of life he resided in a comfortable house in Ohio--a house with a log wing.
"Here was the man for the Whig directors--a military hero and a log cabin farmer, whose ideas on political issues were nebulous. The only problem, as the former head of the defunct United States Bank, Nicholas Biddle, put it, was to keep HARRISON from saying or writing anything on the issues of the day.
In a whirlwind campaign, based on the appeal of log cabins, hard cider, coon-skins, and military glory, the Whigs outwitted Van Buren and put HARRISON into the White House. But alas for designs, HARRISON survived the ordeal for only one month, and dying, left his high office to John Tyler, the Vice
President, on April 4, 1841.

(From "Mr. President: The Presidents In American History)


Harrison, William Henry (1773-1841), ninth president of the United States (1841). His claim to fame rests not on his administration—for he died of pneumonia one month after his inauguration—but on the strange campaign by which in 1840 he attained the high office. A minor military hero, he rode to glory by saying nothing (General Mum, his critics called him), while his party, the Whigs, capitalized on a propaganda blunder by their Democratic opponents to proclaim Harrison a simple man used to living in a log cabin.
Harrison was born on February 9, 1773, to one of the wealthiest, most prestigious, and most influential families in Virginia, on a great plantation in Berkeley County. From the early 17th century on, the Harrisons had accumulated vast landholdings, occupied the highest political and judicial positions, and intermarried with the leading families of Virginia. William Henry's youthful military career and his appointment, when he was not yet 30 years old, to the prominent post of governor of Indiana Territory were due more to the influence of his father, Benjamin Harrison, who had been governor of Virginia, than to any military or administrative talent that he himself had demonstrated.

Military Hero
Harrison had a modest career that was lighted up on two occasions by significant military successes. After devoting his tenure as territorial governor to negotiating the western Native American tribes out of millions of acres, he commanded a force of militia and regulars that put down a Shawnee uprising at Tippecanoe, Indiana, in 1811. Although Harrison's own policies as governor had helped provoke the rebellion, his victory won him a reputation that helped vault him to the presidency a generation later. In the year following the outbreak of the War of 1812, Harrison won another important battle, fought near the Thames River in the province of Ontario, Canada, that ensured continued American control of the western territory.
Although Harrison's career was moderately successful—he was several times elected to the Ohio Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives—his life at this time was beset by financial difficulties. For a short period in 1828 he served as minister to Colombia, but President John Quincy Adams, who appointed him to the diplomatic post because of his connections, had low regard for Harrison's ability, and this poor opinion was shared by political figures in Washington, D.C. The nation, however, remembered his military exploits, and in the mid-1830s and again in 1840 Whig party managers decided to exploit them. As one of a number of Whig candidates in 1836, Harrison was an also-ran. In 1840, however, benefiting from the artful campaign tactics of his party, Harrison succeeded.

The 1840 Campaign
Seeking victory at almost any price, the Whig party in 1840 passed over Henry Clay, its true leader, choosing the aging general instead. To appeal to the South, they chose a states' rights southern Democrat, John Tyler, as his running mate. Convinced that they could win by blaming the severe economic depression on the policies of President Martin Van Buren, they also derided “Van” for his alleged aristocratic manners, commanded Harrison to be silent on the issues, refused to present a party platform, and waged a rousing campaign, using the slogan “Tippecanoe and Tyler too.” Taking advantage of a sneering Democratic reference to Harrison as a man content to sit in his log cabin sipping hard cider, the Whigs' propaganda transformed the Virginia aristocrat into a poor farmer. Seldom has demogoguery paid off so well.
Perhaps Harrison's most significant act in his abbreviated term—he died on April 4, 1841—was his appointment of Daniel Webster as secretary of state.

Contributed by: Edward Pessen

"Harrison, William Henry"
Microsoft (R) Encarta. Copyright (c) 1994 Microsoft Corporation.
Copyright (c) 1994 Funk & Wagnall's Corporation.

[NI0074] Harrison, Benjamin (1726?-1791), American patriot and statesman, born in Charles City County, Virginia. He was a member of the Virginia legislature (1749-75, 1777-81; 1784-91). As representative (1774-77) from Virginia to the Continental Congress, he helped lay the groundwork for the departments of state, war, and the navy. He was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and presided over the debates preceding its adoption. He served (1782-84) as governor of Virginia. In 1788 he was a member of the Virginia convention that ratified the U.S. Constitution. He was the father of William Henry Harrison and the great-grandfather of Benjamin Harrison, presidents of the U.S.

"Harrison, Benjamin (1726?-1791)"
Microsoft (R) Encarta. Copyright (c) 1994 Microsoft Corporation.
Copyright (c) 1994 Funk & Wagnall's Corporation.

Long prominent in Virginia politics, Benjamin V served his state in a number of capacities: as a member of the Virginia house of burgesses; as a delegate to the Continental Congress (1774 - 77); as a signer of the Declaration of Independence; and as governor of Virginia (1781 - 84).

[NI0077] "DANIEL GREGG and MARY JANE WALKER were married April 17, 1839, had fifteen children, including one set of twins, only eight grew to adults."<1>

"DANIEL DIXON was a good provider, engaged in flatboating down the Lattas Creek, White River, Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. A Canalboat Captain between Terre Haute and Evansville on the Canal, crossing the White River at Newberry. He also engaged in teaming supplies into the country,
hauling iron for the first iron bridge across the White River, located a mile north of the present steel bridge, west of Bloomfield."<2>

"My Grandfather, DANIEL G. DIXON, died in 1874, leaving a well equipped home and farm, and investments in Indianapolis vacancies. The estate was administered by ZACK NICHOLS, a son-in-law, under his administration the Indianapolis lots disappeared and the house and farm estate diminished to a small triangle piece of grownd east of the railroad in Dixon Station."<3>

"The town of Dixon was founded and laid out and recorded in November 1872 by D. G. DIXON. The town consist of half dozen families, small store and post office."<5>

"DANIEL G. DIXON lived in or near Terre Haute, Vigo County, Indiana having moved from White River."<8>


Copy from the family record in DIXON Bible owned by MARTHA LOUVINA DIXON GECKLER -- February 24, 1907

Record of DANIEL GREGG and MARY JANE WALKER DIXON'S family.
They were married April 17th, 1839.

JAMES DIXON, son of DANIEL G. and MARY J. DIXON JAMES DIXON died January 18th
was born the 18th of January, year 1841. 1841 -- day of birth.

SARAH ANN GREGG WALKER DIXON, daughter of
DANIEL and MARY DIXON was born April
18th year 1842.

CHARLES WESLEY DIXON, son of DANIEL and MARY
DIXON was born December 27th, 1844.

HARRIET TAYLOR DIXON, daughter of DANIEL and (added later-HARRIET NICHOLS
MARY DIXON was born June 11th, 1847 died Jan. 10, 1878 in Illinois, later
her remains were moved to Switz
City, Ind. March 27, 1907.)

MARY JANE DIXON, daughter was born October 13, MARY JANE DIXON INGERSOLL
in the Year of Our Lord 1849. died June 29th, 1898.

SAMUEL JOSEPH W. DIXON was born March 29, 1851 SAMUEL JOSEPH W. DIXON son of
DANIEL and MARY DIXON died
January 30, 1855 - age 3 years 10 months.

DANIEL and WILLIAM DIXON, twin brothers and WILLIAM died January 14, 1854
sons of DANIEL G. and MARY J. DIXON
were born 14th of January year 1854 DANIEL died October 30, 1854

MARTHA LOUVINA DIXON, daughter of DANIEL and
MARY DIXON was born July 21st, 1855.

NATHAN G. DIXON son of MARY JANE and DANIEL
DIXON was born November 13th, 1857

RACHEL ELIZABETH (BESS) DIXON daughter of
DANIEL and MARY DIXON was born
September 29th, 1859.

Infant son of MARY and DANIEL G. DIXON was Departed this life same date
born March 29th, 1861

KATE AMODINE DIXON daughter of MARY JANE and KATE GASKINS died September
DANIEL DIXON was born April 15, 1862. 12th, 1894

ALICE ADELL DIXON daughter of DANIEL and ALICE ADELL DIXON died Sept.
MARY DIXON was born January 21, 1865 8th, 1865

Infant daughter of MARY and DANIEL DIXON Died the same date.
born December 22, 1866

Source Key
<1> The research of Rooseve Fern Hunt
<2> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Spencer Dixon, dated 30 Jan 1945
<3> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Spencer Dixon, dated 12 Feb 1945
<5> "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" -- 1884
<8> Letter to Nathan Dixon Hunt, dated 25 Aug 1944



[NI0078] "On the day of her parents' departure for Texas, MARY JANE WALKER was married to DANIEL G. DIXON, at the age of sixteen"

"The WALKERs in Texas became slave holders and held with the Southern view of the political issue of the day. Two brothers, CHARLES and JAMES, enlisted in Texas, were captured and landed in the Indianapolis prison stockade. DANIEL DIXON secured their parole and brought them home. JAMES the youngest brother who MARY had never seen, was reconstructed, enlisted in Northern Army. He died in 1865, somewhere in Kentucky on his way to the front. His body was shipped to Indianapolis, teamed to Greene County, where he lies beside his sister MARY JANE in the Dixon Cemetery."

"There is an unverified record of MARY JANE and DANIEL G. DIXON residing in Vigo County, Indiana but their first permanent home appears to have been at Point Commerce, a defunct village on the heights across the Eel River from Worthington. The next permanent home record we have is the Old Dixon Homestead west of the extinct Dixon Station."

"MARY JANE was a modern patriarch, ruling her family to her last active days. During an illness she required the presence of Mother, ANNA DIXON HUNT, and the Pennsylvania Railroad called out a section crew with a hand pump car and issued orders for them to run from Switz City to Dixon Station and return after midnight carrying my Mother; I also was a passenger. This was done perhaps to mollify her for killing a cow, which the railroad would not pay for, claiming the cow trespassed. The family skeleton has whispered that she at one time greased the rails of the Dixon Hill in retaliation. Grandmother was a country Doctor of her time and was widely consulted. She physiced the adult generation of Fairplay Township, then brought their offspring into this world and repeated on them. It is of record she was the first licensed woman doctor in Indiana."<2>


Physician Licence Record #1
MARY J. DIXON
September 17, 1885

(page 23) <9>


".....my first recollection of my Grandmother started in about 1880. She occupied a small house, one of two on the land; the other was occupied for awhile by your Grandparents, (CHARLES and MARY E. DIXON). DAN DIXON was born there. She also owned some vacant lots on the west side of the railroad, some small residences and a store building. In this building she had a small general stock of goods, was Post Mistress and practiced medicine in her own home. She had NELSON GASKINS, who had married KATE AMODINE, as a helper. WALKER GASKINS was born there, as well as myself."

"Part of the ground occupied by Grandmother was tilled and part was an unfenced pasture used by her own cows and hogs, also her neighbor's stock too, few fenced in their stock. Her hogs strayed farther often but her good calling was equal to any distance up to two miles. She had a strong carrying
voice and I believe would have taken a prize in a modern hog calling contest."

"All this has disappeared from the scene now; even the hill on which the railroad's rails were said have been greased by her, have been graded out of existence."<3>

"Old Mrs. DIXON who in her way was a superior nurse, knew all the roots and herbs possessing medical properties which grew in the woods and the prairies and always kept a store on hand. She presided at the entry into this world of most the children born in the Township."<5>


Sources: <2> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Spencer Dixon, dated 30 Jan 1945
<3> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Spencer Dixon, dated 12 Feb 1945
<4> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Wick Miller, dated 07 Mar 1945
<5> "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" -- 1884
<9> Greene County Records, Bloomfield, IN Courthouse



[NI0079] Samuel Dixon was one of three brothers who swam the Ohio River at Madison.



Samuel Dixon was born the 18th day of the 10th month year 1784
Samuel Dixon departed this life the 12th day of the 2nd month, 1839

Sarah Dixon was born the 15th day of the 7th month year 1790
Sarah Dixon, late wife of Samuel Dixon departed this life 1st day of the 2nd month, year of 1820

John Dixon, son of Samuel and Sarah Dixon was born the 27th day of the 9th month year of 1813
John Dixon departed this life the 14th day of the 10th month year 1815
Age 2 years 17 days

Daniel Gregg Dixon was born the 20th day, 2nd month, 1816
Daniel Gregg Dixon died January 29th 1874
Age 57 years 11months and 9 days

Mary Jane Walker Dixon, wife of Daniel Gregg Dixon, daughter of Charles and Harriet Walker was born 9th month, 22nd day, 1822
Mary Jane Walker Dixon, wife of Daniel G. Dixon died June 22, 1891
Age 68 years, 9 months

William S. Dixon son of Samuel and Martha Sontsby Dixon (2nd wife) was born the 9th day, 12th month year 1827 (added later - died in Washington, perhaps year of 1888)

Mary Gregg, wife of Daniel Gregg was born July 2nd, 1762 departed this life 10th day, 7th month, year 1815
Age 53 years, 8 days (Mother of Samuel Dixon, grandmother of Daniel Dixon)

[NI0083]
<"historical Atlas of the State of Indiana" / 1876 / Chicago Public Library / R.912.722.B29>

"PETER INGERSOLL attended the first school in Fairplay Township."



Census of Indiana -- 1830 -- Greene County -- Volume 6, page 318;
Head of family listed -- PETER INGERSOLL, JR. -- 1830
males in family 30 to 50............... 1
females in family under 5.............. 1
females in family between 15 and 20.... 1

<"history of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" / 1884>

"PETER and TYPHENIA INGERSOLL were members of the Presbyterian Church." (page 400)
"PETER INGERSOLL served as Captain in the War of 1812-15." (page 116)
"PETER INGERSOLL was born April 2, 1805 in New York state and at an early day came with his parents to Greene County, Indiana where he married to TYPHENIA WINES, who was born May 9, 1809, a daughter of LEONARD WINES. He died October 9th, 1870, preceded by his wife, May 12th, 1852. The latter rests in peace by the side of her two first born in the village cemetery in Dixon. LIZZIE STARNES died in her home in Kansas. Her remains were brought to Indiana and interred in the cemetery at Worthington where also rest the remains of her Father. (page 403)<5>



"As I remember the old INGERSOLL farm it was a very well kept old fashioned house. Grandfather (PETER INGERSOLL, JR.), his sister DEBORAH HULL, a daughter of Aunt LIZZIE, who married JAMES STARNES, a son, I think his name was HARRISON, we called him TIP, he married MARTHA CAMPBELL who we all knew as Aunt MAT. Then Uncle WICK (J. WICKLIFF INGERSOLL) who was named after WICKLIFFE WINES, he married as you know your Aunt and they lived with Grandfather. At the time of his death WICK bought the shares of the other heirs and remodeled the house."



"My first effort was to trace the ownership of the INGERSOLL homestead, in Old Fairplay, Greene County. Greene County's records show the quarter section was entered or purchased at a Public Land sale by W.C. Field, who in 1841 transferred it to J.W. WINES, at which point the records hump to PETER
INGERSOLL, your Great Grandfather. There is record of your Grandfather purchasing the shares of the heirs of PETER. Your Grandfather improved buildings and farm and upon his death it was a well equipped and kept homestead farm. I enclose a snap taken of it in 1940, a sad reminder to me of the home and farm as I remember it. My first recollection was your Grandfather's (J. WICKLIFF INGERSOLL) funeral, held in the large parlor in the left side, or West end of the house, as shown in the picture, with my Grandmother (MARY INGERSOLL), his sister. I recall as the services progressed the mourning became audible, then louder and louder until I, a small boy, became affected in the same manner when my Grandmother pinched me and shut me up. Pinching must have been on both sides of the family as my Mother (SARAH ANNE GREGG DIXON) used the same method of discipline. This same Grandmother later, once caught me at the Linton Fair attending a striking machine (one of those that you got three strikes with a maul on a lever for a nickel and if you rang the bell at the top of the shaft you got a cigar). She elbowed through the crowd, nipped me by the ear and led me through the crowd away from such hellish business. (One really got a nickel's worth in swinging the maul and grunting). Later in the day I engaged in selling red synthetic lemonade from a rain barrel which she did not object to although the customers were all cheated. Your Grandfather died in Hot Springs, in case you do not know, and left the home and farmland of a well to do farmer, equipped with the best the period afforded to produce a comfortable living. The house shown in the snap was two stories both main and rear el, with a hall through the main building from the front to the rear porch. Large old fashioned fire places were built in each of the two large downstairs rooms -- living and parlor. In the fenced yard was a large tree with an extended limb for a chain swing, smoke house, wash house and a deep well. The well was covered by a large flag stone and the opening was housed in from the roof of which was suspended on a pulley, two "old oaken buckets," which hung in the well. To the West, left in the snap, was large orchard on a hill sloping to the East and South. On the West side of the hill was Indian burial mound built up of sand although the hill was of clay under the top soil. It was perhaps seventy five feet above the surrounding land when TIP and I played around an old excavation on the top. My Father when a boy visiting his Grandfather (PETER INGERSOLL, JR.), remembered that the mound was wooded and that human bones had been taken out. A skull, he remembered, was wired to snap its jaw and jokes were played on visitors by placing it in a closet, operating the jaw with a string.
In about 1890 your Grandmother bought in Worthington, several Texas ponies and helped to introduce this dwarf breed into Greene County stock. Among them were two colts, one of which became TIP's riding pony, TIP was equipped with a suitable cowboy outfit and rode herd on the three or four old
bossies, running them to the barn at milking time, whooping and cracking a long blacksnake whip, driving your Grandmother to distraction and the cows to withholding their output. The other was broke to the family buckboard, but never was trusted like old Doc, ageing family horse who for a generation was
noted for his gentleness and cleanliness -- he slept on one side of his stall and used the opposite for all other purposes. I had the honor of being kicked on same day by TIP's pony, named Barney, and by the alleged family driving horse, Billy. The first by Barney was an entirely unprovoked assault, but in
the case of Billy he was probably aggrieved by my endeavors to hitch him to the buckboard.

"We find record of two PETER INGERSOLLS, one mentioned as a Major in the Revolutionary War and one as a Captain in the War of 1812. They migrated from New York State and PETER JR. and PETER SR. were enumerated in the Census of 1820 and 1830 in Greene County. Can you identify them from you Mother's (DEBORAH INGERSOLL-MILLER) records?

"The INGERSOLLS were unmistakable Whigs and Republicans, as evidenced by the number of given name of HARRISON, starting with your Grandfather's brother, TIP, a political given name honoring the first HARRISON President, shortened to Tip or Tippy as used by your Mother and Grandmother, an abbreviation of Tippecanoe, where Old General HARRISON made a good Indian out of Tecumseh's brother and made himself President. The political rallying cry of that campaign was "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too." The given name WICKLIFF was also a favorite for your family, as you know that it started with WICKLIFF WINES, brother of LEONARD WINES."


Sources: <1> The research of Rooseve Fern Hunt
<4> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Wick Miller, dated 07 Mar 1945
<5> "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" -- 1884
<18> "Historical Atlas of the State of Indiana" -- 1876 -- Chicago Public Library -- R.912.722.B29
<19> Letter from Hannah Hunt Newman to Nathan Dixon Hunt, dated 06 Feb 1945

[NI0085] "The INGERSOLL family is descended from Irish ancestors, who came from England and settled in Massachusetts."<15>

Census of Indiana -- 1820 -- Sullivan County -- Volume 6, page 126;

Head of family listed -- PETER INGERSOLL -- 1820
males in family up to 16............... 2
males in family 16 to 26............... 1
males in family 45 or more............. 1
females in family to 26................ 1
females in family 45 or more........... 1

Census of Indiana -- 1830 -- Greene County -- Volume 6, page 330;

Head of family listed -- PETER INGERSOLL, SR. -- 1830
males in family of 60 and under 70..... 1
females in family of 50 and under 60... 1

(Census material obtained from the Indianapolis Library, Miss ANNA POUCHER)<1>

"PETER INGERSOLL in 1825 gave proof for the Revolutionary Pension."<5>

Sources: <1> The research of Rooseve Fern Hunt
<15> "Biographical Memoirs of Greene County, Indiana With Reminiscences of Pioneer Days" -- Vol 3 -- 1908 -- Indianapolis Library

[NI0092] <-- "Wills of Nelson County, Bardstown, Kentucky 1780-1851" Newberry Library E-495985>

"1806 THOMAS SCHOTES an Englishman but not of Bardstown, Nelson County, state of Kentucky wills that just debts be paid and balance of estate to JOSEPH WALKER of said town and state. (Estate consisted of largely books, engraving tools, types, etc.) Executor, JOSEPH WRIGHT." (page 157)

"JOSEPH WRIGHT witness ARCHIBALD PITT's will, 1818."

<-- "Record of Marriages, Nelson County, Kentucky 1730-1834" Newberry Library E-6906014.62>

"11-24-1818, HARRIET WRIGHT married CHARLES WALKER, father JOSEPH WRIGHT, bondsman WILLIAM NIELL." (page 169)

"AMANDA WRIGHT married WILLIAM SWEET, father JOSEPH, 1828" (page 160)

"JOSEPH WRIGHT bondsman for SARAH WRIGHT, father BENJAMIN WRIGHT." (page 180)

[NI0099] "My Grandfather (JOHN F. HUNT) came from Eaton, Preble County, Ohio. I remember my Grandfather saying his family hailed from New Jersey and called himself a Jersey Irishman."

"There are two Granddaughters and a Grandson of ELIZABETH and WILLIAM CAMPBELL now living in Bowling Green, that I know quite well. They know where the graves of DAVID and MARY HUNT are located. I can remember my Grandfather made a trip down there from Dana, and had stones erected on their graves. He drove down in a horse and buggy. The cemetery is a small obsolete one in a
corner of a field near Bowling Green."

"JOHN F. HUNT came to Vermillion County to work on a canal being built along the Wabash and as I remember the story, he liked the country so well he talked the rest of his family into coming. By the time they came the canal work was farther along and they settled in Owen County near Bowling
Green." <10>

The Wabash and Erie Canal was started in 1837 in Owen County. Work stopped in 1939 and started again in 1945. The Canal was completed in 1849. <1>

"I believe that WILLIAM CAMPBELL married two sisters of my Father (NATHAN DIXON HUNT)." <10>


<1> Source: Research of ROOSEVE FERN HUNT
<10> Source: Letter of ECLA HUNT to <1> dated February 07, 1945

[NI0103] "Harrison David Hunt was born Lewis, Vigo County, Indiana, December 5, 1849. Was educated in the public schools of Owen County. He was married on February 15, 1880 to Rachel E. Dixon, daughter of Daniel G. and Mary J. Dixon of Fairplay Township, Greene County, Indiana. Following children were born HD who married Pearl Price daughter of CA and Ida. Essie Mae is the wife of Oliver W. Underwood, bookkeeper for the Linton Gas Company. Two children died in infancy and Clifford died when four years old."

[NI0120] Gahanna, Ohio
February 11, 1989

Dear Martha: You have been so much on my mind since Christmas. Rec'd your very nice letter & want so to tell you that I have disliked anyone or felt any animosity toward them. Do not remember your Father at all just that his name was BOB. All I do remember is somehow Aunt ROOSEVE would receive word that the two of you would be coming over to 608 or meeting us for lunch, there would be a phone call cancelling or just a no show. Gaffer would go around with an extremely long face & ROOSEVE would cry & say "I hope they know that we love them & want to see them." Oh well that is all in the past.
By the way did you know that ROOSEVE was named after TEDDY ROOSEVELT? They just took the "LT" off. Doesn't that seem odd?
Would have answered your letter sooner but right after Christmas we moved from 4150 N. Hamilton to 689 Havens Corners. They bought our other home & six others to make way for a new grocery store. We lived there for nearly 41 years. At first it was quite a wrench. It seems so odd that you can get
to feel at home in a new place so quickly.
PAUL and I have been married for 43 years. We have a son named RONALD who is 37 years old. He works for the local school system, is a bachelor & says he will never marry. To each his own. You cannot live their life for them. PAUL has a daughter ELAINE from a former marriage. She is living in
Kissimmee, Fla., loves the hot weather which is not for me.
I worked for the local school system in the kitchen until 1983 when I had a mastectomy retired in 1984 because of phlebitis in the left leg. Feel fine now except for arthritis twinges. PAUL has had several illnesses about which I will not go into detail.
Gahanna is more or less an suburb of Columbus. Have lived here all our married life, would never want to move.
GINNY lives in Wis. with her husband, 3 children & 7 grandchildren (lucky her). Have not seen her since DICK died which is about 13 yrs. for some reason we are not very close. Too bad because we are the only ones left of the family. That leaves 4 of us doesn't it? Seems so sad.
Do you remember ANNA BARBARA, Cousin MAMIE & her daughter RUTH? They are all gone except RUTH who is in a nursing hOme in Illinois. How I loved them all, could not wait for summer to come, when I could go to Chicago & see them once again. When I graduated from Ridgeway H.S. in 42 went to Chicago. Got a job as a Route Clerk for Western Union at La Salle & Van Buren. Lived with them all (I mean Gaffer, ROOSEVE, BARBARA & ELEANOR at 608).
PAUL is a retired builder. Very good even if I do say so myself. Loved people to tell him he could not build or do something. Proved them wrong of course. Small detail work was his specialty.
Love your 1st Cuz -- SHIRLEY

[NI0188] "WILLIAM DIXON had a son, MANUEL, who was raised by and with the family of DANIEL GREGG DIXON and later died in Linton."

"WILLIAM DIXON was a Forty-Niner, going to California via the Panama Route. He returned with a bag of gold and a sore leg, overland. (I have a three leg cast iron pot brought back by him in which it is said he brewed herbs with which he treated his leg.) Later he married RACHEL INGERSOLL, a
cousin of Grandmother Ingersoll (MARY INGERSOLL HUNT) and went west again, branching off the Overland Trail west of Fort Bridger, west of Cheyenne somewhere, and homesteaded in Oregon, where his descendants are scattered through the Northwest Pacific States and Montana. Two Grandsons are doctors practicing somewhere East of the Rockies, the last we heard."<2>

Source Key
<2> Letter of Nathan Dixon Hunt to Spencer Dixon, dated 30 Jan 1945

[NI0193] My Grandmother, ny father's mother, was named Martha Solsby. My father went to California in 1850, I think he and two of my half brothers, Bill and Diarius Ingersoll, I am not sure how long he was there about two or three years. He went back to Indiana by boat to the Isthumus to Panama walked across the Isthumus then by boat up to the Atlantic Coast and back to home. As for gold dust ... he did not come back with much money just a few thousand might be considered a lot in those days. My mother was Marie Dixon and she and my father were married the 8th of May 1856. He did not come west again until April 1881. Left Indiana in 1868 settled in Iowa when I was born in 1868. About 1870 moved to Kansas where they stayed until 1881 ... and into Washington where they took government homestead. My father died in January 1887. My mother June 1922. My brother Dan 1907 and my sister Rachel March 7, 1947 age 90 and 19 days she had no children. My brother left two sons, Bill Dixon a big farmer near ... Washington where he settled 66 years ago. Dr. Henry Dixon located here in Portland. He and my grandson are together here, Dixon and Dickel. My brother's daughter Ruth Dixon Peterson live here. I lost my husband in 1900, 2 children my daughter died 10 years ago, my son William Anderson a mining engineer now lives in San Mateo, California but he and his two sons are operating a phosphate mine in Montana.

I have 6 grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren. I will be 79 next November. Have lived every minute to the most of my 79 years, I have gotten a lot out of life and still do. I like life, like people and friends. I realize I haven't too much time left but that is alright too. I am still able to enjoy everything that comes my way.

The only one of my father's people I have ever known is a cousin of my father who married my mother's sister ... Ingersoll. They have both been dead for many years. Their daughter (Billie) Dixon (Camel) lives in Pomona California. Then I knew your Aunt Matt Geckler and Louise.

Very Respectfully yours

[NI0196] "Bill Dixon a big farmer near ... Washington where he settled 66 years ago."

[NI0197] Probable that this is the Dr. Henry Dixon referred to in Letter of Martha L. Dixon Anderson dated July 7, 1947.

[NI0198] "My brother's daugther Ruth Dixon Peterson lives here."

[NI0201] Operating a Phosphate Mine in Montana with his two sons in 1947 according to Letter of Martha L. Anderson date July 3, 1947.

[NI0298] <-- "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" / 1884>

"H.C. who died July 16, 1866 of a disease contracted in service, was a
member of the 115th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. At his death he left a
daughter who now lives with J.W.'s family." (page 379)

[NI0299] <-- "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" / 1884>

"She died in Kansas at her home. Her remains were brought to Indiana,
and interred in the cemetery at Worthington where also rest the remains of her Father." (page 403)

[NI0300] <-- "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" / 1884>

"Passed his boyhood days upon his Father's farm and when 17 years old
volunteered his services for the suppression of the rebellion in Company F,
149th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He served in Georgia and was mustered out
of the services in Terre Haute, Indiana in 1865. J.W. INGERSOLL and MARY JANE DIXON were married in 1869 and to them have been born two children, D.A. and H.P. Miss DIXON, a daughter of DANIEL GREGG DIXON and MARY JANE WALKER who were among the first settlers of Greene County." (page 403)

Sources: 5 "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, Indiana" -- 1884

[NI0337] Lucinda I. Chaney was born on 17 May 1852 in Texas. She married William Richard Hittson on 1 February 1872 in Rule, Carroll County, Arkansas. He was sixteen years older and called Richard.
During the Civil War, Richard was in the battle of Chickamauga. It was a two day battle fought on 19 and 20 Spetember 1863 near Chattanooga, Tennessee. On the first day of battle, Richard was shot. He lay wounded on the battlefield among those left to die. A friend, W.B. McMahan, found him and
pulled him to safety. Richard spent seven months in the hospital. Some say that a leg was amputated while others say that he was left with only some stiffness in the leg.
Following the Civil War, Richard left his home state of Tennesse and moved to Carroll County, Arkansas, where he farmed. His friend, W.B. McMahan, and his family also moved to Carroll County. He met and married Lucinda and began a family. He died of Typhoid Fever in 1892 in Rule.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

Sources: 1. Marriage license of William Hitson (sic) and Lucinda Cheyney (sic).
2. Letter to A. Jane Berry from Patricia Karen Hittson, Aug. 1986. Springdale, Ark.
3. Information provided on reverse of family group sheet for Lucinda Chaney and Richard Hittson by Patricia K. Hittson.

[NI0340] In 1911, the Round Top School, north of Willow Grove, Bell County, Texas, was consolidated with the Willow Grove School. The Round Top School building was relocated and used while a new school bulding was being erected. However, there was concern that a three or four month school term was inadequate and an effort to further consolidate the schools of the area was initiated. Marvel
Stone Chaney was one of the early active supporters of this drive and was among those who went to Austin to secure the consolidation. Their success resulted in an $8,000 bond for construction of a new building for the new Willow Grove Consolidated School District. When the cornerstone was laid on 1
September 1913, Marvel Stone was one of the trustees.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

Sources: 1. Marriage license of Marvel Stone Chaney and T.R. "Hattie" Pinkston. Photcopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
2. Marriage certificate of Marvel Stone Chaney and Delia Garner. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
3. Gravestones in Moody Cemetery, Moody, McLennan County, Texas.
4. History of Bell County Public Schools, 1854 - 1976. Temple-Bell Retired Teachers Association. c1976. Bell County, Texas.

[NI0345] Archie Crill Chaney wa called "Bud". He saw to it that the family graves in the Rule Cemetery, Carroll County, Arkansas, was cared for and had stones placed on the older graves, those of his father, mother, stepmothers, uncle "Bub" and cousins.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

Sources: 1. Marriage certificate of Archie Chaney and Alice McKinney. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
2. Newspaper obituary for Archie Crill Chaney. Unidentified newspaper. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
3. Gravestones in Rule Cemetery, Rule, Carroll County, Arkansas.
4. Arkansas Death Certificate for Archie Crill Chaney. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.

[NI0347] Lucinda I. Chaney was born on 17 May 1852 in Texas. She married William Richard Hittson on 1 February 1872 in Rule, Carroll County, Arkansas. He was sixteen years older and called Richard.
During the Civil War, Richard was in the battle of Chickamauga. It was a two day battle fought on 19 and 20 Spetember 1863 near Chattanooga, Tennessee. On the first day of battle, Richard was shot. He lay wounded on the battlefield among those left to die. A friend, W.B. McMahan, found him and
pulled him to safety. Richard spent seven months in the hospital. Some say that a leg was amputated while others say that he was left with only some stiffness in the leg.
Following the Civil War, Richard left his home state of Tennesse and moved to Carroll County, Arkansas, where he farmed. His friend, W.B. McMahan, and his family also moved to Carroll County. He met and married Lucinda and began a family. He died of Typhoid Fever in 1892 in Rule.

[NI0356] Has been said that William died at age three (3) which would throw some question on death date.

[NI0360] Died of rattlesnake bite on the family farm outside of Gorman.

[NI0480] Possibly of Cherokee extraction.

[NI0692] Probable Brother of Allene Harcrow

[NI0725] Probable Sister of Donald Harcrow.

[NI1046] Early census records list "Kye" Chaney's name as Hezekiah although he is known by later generations as Harrison Kye. His son, Harrison Kye, called "Bud", is usually called Harrison Kye Chaney, Jr. Certainly, "Kye" seems to be a nickname for Hezekiah which seems to be his original name. At some point, he, or some family members, began refering to him as Harrison Kye.
There is a family tradition that one of the grandmothers was a full-blooded Cherokee abducted by one of the grandfathers and married. It is unclear which set of Chaney grandparents this story refers to. It seems probable that Frances was the Cherokee since the previous generation came from further east and north than where the Cherokees usually resided. At the time that Kye and Frances married, around 1859 or 1860, it seems to have been rather common in northwestern Arkansas for such intermarriages.
The identity of his parents has not been established. A Sarah Chaney, age 65, was living with him when the 1860 census was taken. It seems possible that she was his mother. Descendants of his brother, Bob, report that the father of Bob and Kye was named Robert. (It is possible that their father was named William since Kye named one son William Ninevah and another Andrew William. Bob named a son William, as well. Both named daughters Sarah.) Kye had 2 known brothers: Robert "Bob" & "Bud". Bud was killed during the time of the Civil War and is buried in the Rule Cemetery, Carroll Co., Ark. Kye, Bob & Bud may have had a sister, Jane, who married Bill Cross and lived in Coryell Co., Texas. Kye's wife's tombstone reads "L.P. Chaney, wife of H.K.B. 6 May 1846. D. 23 Feb 1904." In the 1900 census, it shows her b. May 1844. On the death certificate of their son, "Bud", his mother is listed as "Frances Goode", informant was Mrs. Ray Pyeatt, his daughter. On another son's, William Nin, she is listed as "Francis Goad," informant, (J.) Claude Chaney, his son.
The family lived several years in Arkansas before coming to Texas. Carroll County, Arkansas, was where Kye was born, reared and married. All of his children were born in Carroll County except the youngest, Zettie, who was born in Little Rock. Two of his children are buried in Rule Cemetery, Rule,
Carroll County, Arkansas. The gravestones are each inscribed "Kye Chaney child." The family arrived in central Texas around 1890. Some of Kye's cousins were in or around Moody, McLennan County, Texas, by that time. It is unclear who arrived first or if they came as a group, but, by the late 1890's,
Kye and some of his brother Robert's children were firmly established in McLennan and Bell Counties, Texas.
Frances died on 9 July 1904 and was buried in Moody. Kye died on 20 May 1907 and was buried next to Frances in a cemetery plot shared with the family of his cousin, Marvel Stone Chaney.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

1900 Census of McLennan County, Texas lists his birthdate as January of 1832.

Sources: 1. 1860 Census, Carroll County, Arkansas
2. 1879 Census, Liberty Township, Carroll County, P.O. Berryville, Arkansas. August 02, 1870. Page 6. (Liberty Township later became Rule.)
3. 1880 Census, Hickory Township, Carroll County, Arkansas. June 05, 1880.
4. Gravestones in Moody Cemetary, Moody, McLennan County, Texas.
5. Gravestones in Rule Cemetary, Rule, Carroll County, Arkansas. In burial plot with Robert Chaney, Bud Chaney and Robt. Chaney family members.
6. Interviews with Irene Chaney, daughter of Harrison "Bud" Chaney.
7. Texas Deaths 1903-1940
H.K. Chaney - Bell County - 14 April 1936 - Certificate Number 18398
W.N. Chaney - Bell County - 09 Oct 1936 - Certificate Number 47974
8. General Index of Marriages - Bell County, Texas
Zettie Chaney - Ed Witt - 1903 - Vol 0, Page 317
9. Research of Adelia Jane Berry

[NI1048] Kye's wife's tombstone reads "L.P. Chaney, Wife of H.K." born 6 May 1846, died 23 Feb 1904.

In 1900 Census of McLennan County, Texas, her birthdate is shown as May 1844.

On death certificate of her son, Harrison Kye "Bud" Chaney, she is listed as Francis Goode.

On death certificate of William Ninevah Chaney she is listed as Francis Goad.

-- Adelia Jane Berry / Charles Claude Chaney

[NI1049] Although later records show John Wesley Chaney's year of birth as being 1854, early records indicate otherwise. The 1870 census lists his age as nine early in the year. His marriage license states his age as 22 in March of 1883. Although the 1880 census lists his age as 18 in June, it does seem
probable that he was born in 1860. Also, in the 1860 census, his parents indicate no children in the household. In the 1900 census, they report that they had been married for 39 years which indicates that they married in 1859.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

Sources: 1. U.S. Census - 1870. Liberty Township, Carroll County, Arkansas, P.O. Berryville. Page 6.
2. U.S, Census - 1880. Hickory Township, Carroll County, Arkansas. 5 June 1880
3. 12th U.S. Census - 1900. McLennan County, Texas.
4. 13th U.S. Census - 1910. McLennan County, Texas. 3 May 1910. Justice Precinct #6. Supervisor's District #11, Enumeration District #105. Sheet 19B. 5284. Household/family 298/300.
5. Marriage license of John W. Chaney and Adah Hays, Carroll Co., Arkansas.
6. Information received by Adelia Jane Berry from David C. Cook, of Pits Dillon Funeral home, Cleburne, Texas. 1977.
7. Death certificate of Ada Ann (Hays) Chaney, Bureau of Vital Statistics, State Board of Health. Cert. No. 38951.
8. Gravestone information from Cahil Cemetery, Alvarado, Johnson Co., Texas.
9. Research of Adelia Jane Berry.

[NI1050] Nin was one of the early trustees of Willow Grove School, #96, in Bell County, Texas.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

Sources: 1. 1900 Census. Bell County, Texas. Precinct 5. 6 June 1900. Extracted by preparer.
2. Newspaper obituary for Adelia Boyd (Bishop) Chaney. WACO NEWS TRIBUNE,
Nov. 1973. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry as well as two other obituaries, worded identically, from other papers.
3. Obituary for William Alton Chaney, Thursday, May 13, 1976. Newspaper unidentified. Clipping in possession of A. Jane Berry.
4. Gravestones in Moody Cemetery, Moody, McLennan County, Texas. Recorded by
preparer and A. Jane Berry.
5. Gravestones in Pendleton Cemetery, Bell County, Texas. Photographs in possession of A. Jane Berry.
6. Gravestones in Evergreen Cemetery, El Paso, Texas. Photographs in possession of A. Jane Berry.
7. Gravestones in unidentified cemetery (probably Pendleton, Bell County, Texas) from photograph in possession of A. Jane Berry.
8. History of Bell County Public Schools, 1854 - 1976. Temple-Bell Retired Teachers Association. c1976. Bell County, Texas.

[NI1054] Although later records state that she was born in 1870, the 1880 census, taken in June, records her age as 13 which indicates that she was probably born in 1866.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

[NI1055] Although Martha Jane Chaney Akin's death certificate records her year of birth as 1877, the 1880 census states her age, in June, as one year. This indicates that her actual year of birth must have been 1879.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

Sources: 1. Marriage certificate for Martha Jane Chaney and Silas Akin. Photcopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
2. General Index to Marriages - Bell Co., Texas
Martha J. Chaney - Silas Akin 1892 Vol K page 18.
3. 1900 Census. Texas. Bell County. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
4. Death certificate for Martha Jane (Chaney) Akin, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Texas Department of Health Resources, Austin, Texas. Photocopy in possession of A. Jane Berry.
5. Gravestone in Moody Cemetery, Moody, McLennan County, Texas. Plot is adjacent to the on of her brother, H.K. "Bud" Chaney.

[NI1057] Harrison Kye Chaney was known as "Bud." Later generations often said that he was named for his father and, thus, was a junior. However, it has been determined that his father was named Hezekiah and was called "Kye." It is possible that his father did use "Harrison Kye" instead of "Hezekiah" at
some time late in life.
Bud was known to be a rather rough character who was no stranger to alcohol. As an adult he farmed although he seems to have almost always have been involved with mules and mule-trading. Railroads seem to have been an important aspect of his life as well. Jake recalled that when he was a boy
his father, along with other men in the area, had been hired by the railroad to bring their mules and wagons to help clear up after a train wreck near Moody. At some time, Bud served as a "Bull" on a railroad.
In 1913, the family was living in southern McLennan County near the Bell County line. It was probably in the Willow Grove community. About 1913, the family home burned. "Bud" was out of town as he often was. The fire started at about five in the morning. Cora had started the fire in the cookstove and gone to her bedroom for something. When she returned, the kitchen was ablaze. One wall, dividing the kitchen and the bedroom where Tommy slept, was about to collapse. The family hurriedly attempted to save what they could. Cora grabbed a pair of Bud's shoes only to discover later that they were not
mates. Inez struggled with the sewing machine. She valued it highly because her mother made her dresses on it. Tommy had on his long underwear as he ran across the field to his uncle's house. (This could be Bud's brother, John, or his brother-in-law, Edgar Witt, who was married to his sister, Zettie.) Soon, people had come from all around to help, but, they couldn't save anything.
Everything in the house except the few items initially rescued were lost: all of their clothes, furniture and bedding. Some flat-irons were found among the ruins and Cora used them for years after. Just after the fire, someone stole all of the meat, hams, bacon and sausages which had not been stored in the house. The family stayed with relatives (not identified) and neighbors brought them clothes and food. They received meat, potatoes, cakes, cookies, fruit, beans, sugar, and many other things. Someone brought a big comforter and others brought other bedding.
Bud and Cora went to Moody and spent what little money they had left on beds, dressers, chairs and other furniture at a second-hand furniture store. Bud rented a house and had a job in Moody. Somehow, Bud got cottonseed for the next year's crop and the family began to rebuild its life. Everyone had to pitch in.
Most of the land was in cotton but they also grew corn and maize. There was a garden for vegetables including several rows of popcorn. The entire family had to help do the farm work including chopping and picking the cotton. A pipe ran from a creek so that water could be pumped to fill the livestock troughs. They had one milk cow for which Inez was responsible for feeding. She helped with the dishes and did some of the ironing. She had to trim the lamp wicks and clean the glass chimneys on the lamps. While Cora was doing farm work, Inez tended the younger children. Even when picking cotton she had to see to them. She would sit them on the cotton sack or under the wagon where it was cooler. Jake would bring them cool water during the day. The children got paid for "scrappin'" which consisted of going over the fields after the cottonpickers were done and picking any cotton which had been missed. Tommy chopped the wood and kindling as well as other chores. The children were not usually paid for the cotton picking although Bud would take them to town for "red soda water" and, once, to a carnival as reward. They shelled corn which Bud took to the mill to be ground. The family had cornmeal every day during this difficult time. The evening meal often was cornmeal and milk except when the one cow was dry.
The family had three beds. One for Bud and Cora, one for the boys and one for the girls. When the weather was cold, Cora would put a heated brick in the beds to keep the bed warm. They did not go anywhere except to Moody to do the necessary shopping and to church. Most of their life was home
oriented. One Christmas during this period when they had very little, the children did not expect even a Christmas tree. However, Bud hitched up two mules and loaded them all in the wagon and drove to Cedar Creek where they cut a little tree. Back home, the little tree was set up and decorated with red
and green paper that the children used at school. They popped corn and strung it on the tree. Mistletoe was hung over the doors. The children were thrilled to have a tree since they knew that they couldn't afford presents. Suddenly, a relative appeared with toys and peppermint stick candy for them
which made it a memorable Christmas for them all.
The fire had destroyed almost everything the family had, but, with the help of friends, family and neighbors, they slowly returned to normal.
In 1916, the family lived north of Temple where Beatrice was born. Bud was working for a Dr. Stevens at that time. Then they moved into Temple to Nugent and Fifteenth Streets where James was born in 1918. In 1921, when Jack was born, they were living in Pendleton. By 1924, they were again living in Temple, on Bentley Hill, and Bud was working for R.V. Nichols who operated a mule barn. Bud travelled and bought mules.
On 28 August 1924, Bud was in south Texas buying mules for Mr. Nichols. Tommy worked nights with the Sante Fe railroad as a night supply man. Jake worked for the city driving a dumptruck. Cora tended the family while Bud was out of town. Cora and the younger children had been picking cotton that
morning. They came home for lunch. Tommy was sleeping since he worked nights. Tommy awoke and borrowed some money from his mother since he was broke and wanted to go to the "show." They had lunch at the table which was located on a screened-in porch at the back of the house. Cora returned to
pick cotton leaving Irene to wash the dishes, clean the kitchen and tend three-year-old Jack. Tommy wrote a letter to his girlfriend and left on foot. When Irene went to the outhouse she had a strange feeling that something was going to happen.
That night, Irene slept with Cora. Jack usually slept with his mother. They had trouble sleeping since their cow was bawling. It was unusual for the cow to be so noisy. They eventually got to sleep but at about four in the morning they heard a car pull into the lane to the house. It was Mr. and Mrs. Nichols. They told Cora that Tommy had been hurt and that they had come to take her to the hospital. She went with the Nichols while the children helped Jake try to start the city dumptruck so they could go to the hospital too. They were still attempting to get it started when the car returned. Tommy had been struck by a switch engine as he walked across the tracks in the yards near the downtown Sante Fe passenger depot. He was terribly injured and lived only a short time. It was a large funeral after which a long caravan of cars drove to Moody where Tommy was buried next to his sister, Loraine, who had died as a child in 1911.
Bud had a group of buddies that he spent a lot of time with. One story tells of the time that they were all down by the creek drinking. Of course, most of the men usually carried their rifles. One of the men, a barber, expressed an interest in Bud's gun. Bud told him if he touched it that he would shoot him. The barber thought he was joking and reached for the gun. Bud grabbed the rifle and shot him. It evidently was not a serious wound since Bud continued to let the barber shave him afterwards.
There is a story that Bud led a lynch-mob at one time. The story is that it involved a black man involved in the rape of a white woman. Supposedly, Bud headed the mob carrying an axe.
During prohibition, Bud was not deprived of his alcohol. He hid bottles all around the farm where they were living. Jack recalls finding one of the bottles in a barrel of grain and drinking it. He got very ill and was on the porch throwing-up. Cora was very upset because she thought he was deathly ill. Claude came home at that time and immediately realized that Jack wasn't sick but down-right drunk.
Evidently, alcohol caused Bud to become unreasonable quite often. More than once he supposedly became angry with Cora and took after her with a butcher knife.
In 1936, while walking across the viaduct on Adams Street in Temple near their home on 19th Street he collapsed. He was taken the short distance home where died. He was buried in Moody along side his son, Tommy, and daughter, Laraine.
Cora lived a quiet life being visited by her children and grandchildren who also assisted her financially from time to time. Eventually, she had an apartment in the Jonathan Moore Homes, a federally subsidized housing project. Two of her daughters also lived in the project. Inez was there for
many years until her death. Beatrice lived there for several years. Cora dipped snuff, usually Garrett's brand which came in a small glass tumbler with a lid. She always had an empty coffee can with paper in the bottom next to her chair. In later life she developed diabetes which led to some problems with her feet. After a short stay in the hospital and a nursing home, she died in 1968. She was buried along side Bud in the Moody cemetery.

-- Charles Claude Chaney

Sources: 1. 1910 Census Records, McLennan County, Texas. Justice Precinct No. 6, Supervisors District 11, Enumeration District 105
2. Obituary of Thomas Morran "Tommy" Chaney, Temple Daily Telegram, Temple, Bell County, Texas - August 29, 1924
3. Obituary of H.K. "Bud" Chaney, Temple Daily Telegram, Temple, Bell County, Texas -- April 15, 1936
4. Death Certificate #18398 for H.K. "Bud" Chaney, Texas State Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics
5. Obituary of Cora (Reed) Chaney, Temple Daily Telegram, Temple, Bell County, Texas -- January 14, 1968
6. Gravestones in Moody Cemetary, Moody, McLennan County, Texas
7. General Index of Marriages -- Bell County, Texas
Beatrice Chaney -- D.C. Williams 1932 Vol 29, Page 511
Irene Chaney -- Ray Pyeatt 1930 Vol 29, Page 619
8. Texas Probated Births
Claude Chaney Bell County 15 April 1913 Certificate# 142325
Irene Chaney Bell County 13 January 1913 Certificate# 1011037
9. Texas Deaths 1903 - 1940
H.K. Chaney Bell County 14 April 1936 Certificate# 18398
M. Tom Chaney Bell County 28 August 1924 Certificate# 25260
10. Interviews by Charles Claude Chaney with Inez Chaney, Irene Chaney, Claude Chaney, Zelma Cownover, Edith Merle Paulk, Jack Chaney, Beatrice Chaney and Maudie Ruth Canady
11. "After The Fire" by Inez (Chaney) Newman, from "The Way It Was" the Central Texas RSVP BiCentennial Scrapbook, Volume One, Published by the Retired Senior Volunteer Program of the Central Texas Council of Governments, Belton, Texas -- Speedy Print, Temple, Texas 1976
12. Research of Adelia Jane Berry

[NI1111] It is unverified that Jane Chaney was the daughter of Robert and Sarah.

[NI1136] Married a Chelan, Washington native in California. Lived in California for 35 years and then retired to Chelan, Washington. There were no children. Living in Chelan, Washington in 1989.

[NI1137] Died at age of 90 (1935-1938)

Went to Alaska to prospect.

[NI1139] Was contacted probably by Rooseve Fern Hunt doing genealogy research.

[NI1141] Harrison, Benjamin (1833-1901), 23rd president of the United States (1889-93), who directed a reformulation of the Monroe Doctrine that was to end American isolationism and set the stage for future territorial and trade expansion.
Harrison was born on August 20, 1833, at North Bend, Ohio. The grandson of President William Henry Harrison, he grew up on his father's farm on the banks of the Ohio River. After graduating from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, he took a law clerkship in Indianapolis and married his college sweetheart, Caroline Scott. He soon became involved in the newly formed Republican party, serving as secretary to the state convention and as a popular campaign speaker.
During the American Civil War, Harrison helped raise Indiana's 70th Infantry and became its commander. He was promoted to brigadier general after serving with distinction in the Atlanta campaign. When peace came, he returned to his law practice in Indianapolis and resumed activities in the Republican party. Defeated in a bid for the governorship of Indiana in 1876, he served in the U.S. Senate from 1881 to 1887.

Harrison as President
In 1888 party factionalism prevented the nomination of the leading presidential contender, James G. Blaine, and Harrison, a dark horse, won the Republican party's nomination for the presidency.
Harrison defeated the incumbent, Grover Cleveland, on a platform of protectionism. As president, however, Harrison was never a charismatic leader, nor was he able to negotiate alliances with Congress to obtain support for his policies. His isolation from Congress promoted further charges of coldness (“cold as ice” had been a description of his gubernatorial candidacy) and lost him the support of many party members. He continued the civil service reforms of his predecessors, but at a moderate pace, alienating both those Republicans who were looking for spoils and those urging more rapid reform. Moreover, although he had campaigned on a platform of liberalizing veterans' pensions, he was forced to remove his own commissioner of pensions for lavishly and scandalously distributing awards.
Harrison experienced difficulty in maintaining a stable national economy. The Bland-Allison Act of 1878 required the treasury to buy $2 million of silver for coinage each month. As the market value of silver fell, the president sought to limit coinage. Advocates of free coinage forced a compromise bill, the Sherman Silver Purchase Act (1890), which required the government to buy more silver but limited coinage. The increased purchase drained gold from the reserves, and Harrison twice had to avert panic by releasing more currency.
Harrison had campaigned on a platform of increasing protectionist tariffs. Although the public supported increased tariffs at the time of the election, the effect of the McKinley Act (1890) was to contribute to inflationary prices for necessities, and protectionist tariffs ultimately became unpopular.
Harrison admitted several new states to the Union during his term. He increased the size of the merchant marine to facilitate expanded trade and of the navy to protect commercial interests abroad. The first Pan-American Conference, held during his administration, created new commercial and diplomatic ties between the U.S. and independent republics in Latin America.

Later Career
A loyal Republican, Harrison continued to serve as his party's spokesman after his defeat by Grover Cleveland in 1892. He resumed his law practice, taking on the international border dispute between Venezuela and British Guiana (now Guyana) and earning respect for his legal expertise. He also wrote several addresses and articles on governmental affairs that were well received and widely read. He died a respected elder statesman, on March 13, 1901.

Contributed by: Robert D. Marcus

"Harrison, Benjamin (1833-1901)" Microsoft (R) Encarta.
Copyright (c) 1994 Microsoft Corporation.
Copyright (c) 1994 Funk & Wagnall's Corporation.

[NI1145] According to family bible page:

Twin sister to Harold Dean Sparks, "borned 10 o'clock July 13, 1925." Died "July 14, 1:30 o'clock"

[NI1224] Practiced Medicine in Portland, Oregon with Dr. Henry Dixon

[NI1225] Referred to in Letter of Martha L. Anderson dated July 3, 1947. First name may be Lori.

"The only one of my father's people I have ever known is a cousin of my father who married my mother's sister (Lori) Ingersoll."

[NI1226] Referred to in Martha L. Anderson's Letter dated July 3, 1947. Last name may be Camel or Cowel

[NI1251] Benjamin IV had never been as active politically as his father or
grandfather. He is known to have been a justice of the peace in Charles City
County and to have represented that county for a number of years in the House
of Burgesses. He was also king's lieutenant in Charles City County

[NI1255] Married Peyton Randolph, son of John Randolph of Tazewell Hall, Williamsburg.
Her husband was to be speaker of the House in decade preceding the American
Revolution. Randolph, along with his brother-in-law, Benjamin Harrison V,
would be elected as members of Virginia's delegation to the First Continental
Congress. Peyton Randolph would be the first president of the Continental
Congress. They had no children.

[NI1256] Married William Randolph of Wilton (1710 - ) , son of William II of
Chatsworth (1681 - 1742).
Children:
Wm. Beverly Randolph (no issue)
Peter Randolph m. 1st Mary Spotwood
2nd Mary Page (no issue)
Harrison Randolph (no issue)
Benjamin Randolph (no issue)
Peyton Randolph m. Lucy Harrison, his first cousin, daughter of Benjamin V
Anne Randolph m. Benjamin Harrison of Brandon, probably a cousin and the son
or grandson of Nathaniel Harrison of Brandon
Elizabeth Randolph m. Philip Grymes
Lucy Randolph m. Lewis Burwell of King's Mill

[NI1257] By some accounts, Hannah and her sister, Lucy, and her father, Benjamin IV,
were struck and killed by lightning in a summer storm at Berkeley in 1745.

[NI1258] Died young.

[NI1259] Died young.

[NI1260] Nathaniel Harrison settled in Prince George County where he later became
sheriff. Along with his brothers, supported the Revolutionary cause. After
statehood was established in Virginia, Nathaniel was elected to the upper
house, the Senate, where he was chosen speaker. By coincidence, his older
borther, Benjamin V, the Signer, was at the same time speaker of the House of
Delegates, the lower chamber of the General Assembly.

[NI1261] Carter Henry Harrison moved to Cumberland County in south central Virginia as a young man and later became a prominent leader in that area during the American Revolution. He is alleged to have been the author of the Cumberland County Resolutions, one of the first series of resolves drawn up in any of the
colonies calling for independence from Great Britain.

[NI1262] Charles Harrison was a distinguished Revolutionary War officer. A colonel in the First Continental Artillery, he was later promoted to brigadier general and became chief of artillery to Major General Nathanael Greene.

[NI1263] Benjamin III made numerous additions to the family estate in several counties.
He became a prominent merchant and public servant. Before his untimely death
in 1710 from a stroke, he held the offices of acting attorney general of
Virginia, speaker of the House of Burgesses, and treasurer of the colony. At
the time of the birth of his son Benjamin IV in 1700, it is recorded that he
owned 80 slaves at Berkeley and at least 20 more elsewhere, besides his
extensive land holdings.

[NI1264] Elizabeth's husband, Benjamin III, died before her and left no will. She sold
500 acres in two grants on the south side of the James River, along with 20
slaves. While she was still alive, the Harrison mansion called Berkeley was
constructed -- about 1726.

[NI1266] At the time of his mother's death and the acquisition of his land inheritance Benjamin Harrison was already a successful trader and planter. He operated a river-front store which was a combination of a wharf, a tobacco warehouse and a storage house for imports. He represented Surry County in the House of Burgesses between 1679 and 1698. He was also sheriff of Surry County in 1679.
In 1698 he became a member of the council of Virginia and held that high office until he died 14 years later. He added a substantial number of acres to the family estate.

[NI1268] Hannah Harrison was the grandmother of Richard Henry Lee and Francis Lightfoot
Lee, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

[NI1270] Benjamin Harrison I arrived in Virginia, probably from England, about 1632. He first established himself in the region of Isle of Wight and Surry Counties. He pattented a number of parcels of land between 1635 and 1643. When he died, sometime before October 9, 1649, he owned at least 1,240 acres.

[NI1271] Known only as Mary. After the death of her husband, Benjamin Harrison I, she remarried. She bore her second husband, Captain Benjamin Sidway, whom she also survived, one son. Mary, who appears to have been illiterate, left only her mark in the will drawn up for her on March l, 1678/1688. Upon her death most of the estate was divided between her sons Benjamin Harrison II and Thomas Sidway. Peter Harrison had died before his mother and had not left children.

[NI1272] Peter Harrison died before his mother and left no children.

[NI1273] Jacob Chaney, the ancestor of all the Chaney Families of Pittsylvania and Halifax Counties, Virginia, and the surrounding country, was supposed to have imigrated from France, as the name is generally considered a French name, in the seventeenth century, and settled near the shore. Jacob's father was with him and his mother being dead, his father married again and it is said his stepmother broke a skillet, placed the pieces together and sent Jacob in an old kitchen to bring it. When he caught hold of it , it fell to pieces. His father was gone from home that day and on his return she told him that Jacob had broken the skillet. After his father had severely punished him, he also told Jacob that he didn't care if he went away and that he could never see him again.

Jacob was about 18 years old at the time he left his father. He went to Northern Virginia or Maryland and lived a while. From there he moved to Bedford County, Virginia, where he married Sarah Midkiff, then he moved to Pittsylvania County and settled on Elk Horn Creek two miles north of Peytonsburg, Virginia. He at the time had a wife and several children. While Jacob would be gone, sometimes as far as sixty miles to a mill, his wife and children would build large sparkling fires to keep the wild animals away. In those days the black bear, the panther and the wolf were yet to be seen in the forest and were no doubt dreaded by the settlers.

I was told by some ot the older ones who are now gone that Jacob dreamed while living on Elk Horn Creek, that further south about ten miles there were two creeks now known as Birch Creek and Buck Horn Creek, a small creek which empties into Birch Creek in the southeastern part of Pittsylvania County. He also dreamed of the large shelving rocks projecting from the earth and inclining south, as the actually are, where cattle could find refuge from cold winds. Jacob's dream had so much weight he came over south to investigate. He found everything so much like he had dreamed it and he was very much pleased. He went around and chopped off as much land as he wanted to pay taxes on and had it recorded at the county seat. This land was government land at the time. This was in the year 1750. Jacob moved over to his new place and settled in the fork of Buck Horn and Birch Creeks near the junction and brought his drinking water from the south side of Birch Creek. Later on, he built a home on top to the hill near the place now know as the Chaney Burying Ground. Some of this land has never been changed from the Chaney name, the present owner S.S. Chaney is one of the fourth generation from Jacob.

I don't know whether Jacob was a member of any church or not. I am inclined to believe, however, that he was a devout man, as he named some of his boys scriptural names and some of them were members.

Jacob raised nine boys, I have been told, and I will here give the names of them as follows: William, Moses, Joseph, Abraham, Charles, Thomas and Nathaniel. The former six settled near the old homestead. Nathaniel and two others whose names I have forgotten went away to the Western part of this country.

I do not know the date of Jacob's death or how old he was, but I suppose he was getting along in years. He was buried in the Chaney buried in the Chaney Burying Ground.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

Abraham Chaney b.1760 @@Halifax, Virginia. Abram's father, Jacob, (b.1715) did come from Anne Arundel Co., MD; and, his father, Charles, b. June 6, 1673, did have a half-brother, Richard 'b.1649/
1650'. They are sons of the CHEYNEY emigrant, *Richard (b.`1627) in Kent, Eng.

Posted to Genforum by Preston Glenn Humphrey on April 26, 1998

[NI1275] William Chaney, the son of Sarah and Jacob Chaney (Chapter I), settled and lived on the Mountain Road near where Roxboro Schoolhouse now stands, about one mile from the old Chaney homestead, William is supposed to have been a farmer by occupation all of his life.

William raised nine children, of whom there were four boys and five girls. The boys were: Joshua, Zekiel, Clayton and Braxton. The girls were: Eleandor, Elizabeth, Lydia, Nancy and Eliza. I don't know anything relative to William's religious belief and nothing in regard to his children except Joshua.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1276] Moses Chaney, the son of Sarah and Jacob Chaney, settled two miles southeast of Laurel Grove, Virginia, on the place now owned by Witcher Slayton.

Moses married Margaret Davis, and to this union were born six children. Their name were as follows: William, Singleton, Bird, Moses, Betty and Sallie. Margaret died and after her death Moses married Sallie Polly, a widow, whose name was Haley. Tho this second union were born two children, Jackson and Eleandor.

Moses was a farmer by occupation.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1277] Joseph Chaney, the son of Sarah and Jacob Chaney, settled about one mile north of his father's home place, on the land owned at the time of the writing by H. Watson Chaney, here he was engaged in farming all of his life.

In accordance with my knowledge, Joseph raised only two boys. One was named Rueben, the name of the other one I have never been able to find. He imigrated somewhere-- it is supposed to have been the Western part of this country.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1278] Abraham Chaney, the son of Sarah and Jacob Chaney, was born in the year of 1760, and died December 25, 1848. He lived all his life at the old Chaney home.

During Abraham's long life of about 88 years he married twice-- first to a Miss Cheathum, and to this union there were born five children: Eli, Dicie, Cheatum, and Elizabeth. John was a tailor by occupation. He emigrated to Tennessee. Eli went to Patrick County, Virginia. Dicie married a Puckett and went West. Cheatum was in the war of 1812, during which time he died in Norfolk, Virginia, and was buried there. Elizabeth married Jesse Reeves-- more information will be given in regard to her in a latter chapter.

Abraham was married the second time to Nancy Dennison, and to them were born sever children: Abraham, Anderson, Henry, Mary, Nancy, Susan and Sallie.

Abraham was a member of the New School Baptists. He wa very zealous in the cause, so I have been told, and often had prayer meetings at his home.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

Abraham Chaney b.1760 @@Halifax, Virginia. Abram's father, Jacob, (b.1715) did come from Anne Arundel Co., MD; and, his father, Charles, b. June 6, 1673, did have a half-brother, Richard 'b.1649/
1650'. They are sons of the CHEYNEY emigrant, *Richard (b.`1627) in Kent, Eng.

Posted to Genforum by Preston Glenn Humphrey on April 26, 1998

[NI1279] Charles Chaney, the son of Sarah and Jacob Chaney, settled on land joining the northwestern border of the old Chaney homestead tract. He was married, but very little if anything is known about his wife.

Charles reared five children, of whom there were four boys and one girl. The boys were Samuel, Jackson, Jonas and Zar, and the girl was named Kate.

Charles, like his father Jacob, also engaged in agriculture.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1280] Thomas Chaney, the son of Sarah and Jacob Chaney, settled on the south side of Birch Creek, two miles Northeast of Laurel Grove, Virginia. Here he lived all of his life, though little is known as to his age, date of death and the place of his burial.

Thomas was married, but I do not know his wife's maiden name. To this union there was born only one son, and to whom Thomas gave his own name, Thomas.

While living, Thomas was a farmer by occupation and it seems was a prominent business man, as he left valuable property to heirs at his death.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1282] Joshua Chaney, the son of William Chaney, lived near Ringgold Virginia.

Joshua was married, but it is not known what his wife's maiden name was. He raised eight children , whose names were: Richard, Gally, Jonas, John, Whit, Mary, Julia and Betty.

[NI1291] Thomas Chaney, the only son of Thomas Chaney, lived most of his life on his father's old home place, but died near Danville, Virginia.

Thomas was married twice during his life. By his first wife he raised two children, Martha and Amanda; and by his second wife he also raised two children, Ezekiel and Bendy. Exekiel married a Miss Keeling and Bendy married a Mr. Meyers, and Martha married Moses Moss.

Thomas was a member of the Methodist Church and took an active part in the church.

[NI1297] Reuben Chaney, the son of Joseph Chaney, lived for a while at his father's old home place, then he and his son William emigrated to the state of Indiana, where he later died.

Reuben was married but I don't know who his wife was before their marriage. He raised one son whose name was William, and of whom there is right much said in a later chapter.

As far as can be learned Reuben was a farmer by trade.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1299] William Chaney, the son of Margaret and Moses Chaney, was a farmer by ocupation He was born September 20, 1792, and died February 19,1876, age 83 years 5 months and 5 days. He was buried at his home place two miles southeast of Laurel Grove, Virginia, the place his son Beverly now lives.

During William's lifetime he was married twice, first to Nancy Polly, and to this union were born three children - Willis C., Sallie Bird, and Calvin W.

William's second wife's name was Elizabeth Bradley, and to them ten children were born as follows: Wilis, Martha, Jasper, William, Mary, Frances, Daniel S. Alfred, Beverly W., and Elizabeth.

It will be seen that William reared thirteen children.

[NI1303] Bettie Chaney, the daughter of Margaret and Moses Chaney, married Giddeon Moss, and to this union there were six children, whose names were as follows: Moses, Chestina, Margaret, Mary , John and Rebecca.

Moses married Martha Chaney, Chestina married Banister Walton, Margaret married William Slayton, Mary married Robert Bradley, and John was in the Civil War, during which time he died. Rebecca married W. T. Walton.

Bettie, with her husband Giddeon Moss, lived one mile north of Sutherlin, Virginia, near Double Creek.

[NI1306] Jackson Chaney, the son of Sallie and Moses Chaney, married Annie Milam. They raised, in accordance with my knowledge, eight children, Martha , Edith, Annie, Eliza, Nadie, John R., Delila and Jennie.

Martha married John Young- Edith married William Payne- Annie married William Blair - Eliza married Paul Moorefeild- Nadie married George Thompson - John married a Miss McCormick - Delila married McDearman Anderson - Jennie married William J. Daniel.

Jackson was a farmer by occupation. He lived to be a very old man and died on the place owned by him at the time of his death, which is two and one-half miles southeast of Laurel Grove, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

Jackson never united to any church, though his sentiments were with the Old Primitive Baptists. The writer of this has often seen him at Old Mill Meeting House.

[NI1312] Elizabeth Chaney, the daughter of Abraham Chaney and by his first wife, married Jesse Reaves and lived near the place now known as Birch, Virginia. To this union were born seven children - George, Daniel, Jesse, Abraham, Nancy, Ephream and Katie.

Elizabeth was a business woman and very kind hearted. She was a member of the Missionary Baptist and was on of their faithful members. She lived to be seventy years old.

[NI1315] Abraham Chaney, Jr., the son of Nancy and Abraham Chaney, Sr., the son of Sarah and Jacob Chaney, was born December 14, 1813, in Pittsylvania County, Virginia and died September 4, 1878, in Surry County, North Carolina, age 64 years, 8 months and 20 days. he was buried near Crutchfield, N.C. A monument marks his grave.

Abraham was married twice, his first wife's name was Sallie Bird Chaney, the daughter of William Chaney (Chapter XV): She was born Dec. 12, 1817, and died July 2, 1851, aged 33 years, 6 months and 20 days. She was buried at her father's old home place. To this union there were born six children - Mary J., Harriet A., William B., Martha W., Henry Watson, and John C. His second wife's name was Mary Ann Richardson, the daughter of William Richardson. She was born Dec. 28, 1832 and to this union eleven children were born - Charlie A., Mary S., Thomas, Rebecca, Tapley S., Sallie W., Tassalou A., Luther T., Albert C., Banister Rosco and Fannie E.

Abraham, the father of the above children was a wheel -wright by occupation. Early after his first marriage he settled one mile east of Laurel Grove,Virginiaa, on the place now known as the late Joseph Davis place. His first wife died and he married his second wife in that section.

In about the year 1856 he was elected Steward - of -the - Poor of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He then sold out at Laurel Grove and moved up near the White Oak Mountains. Very soon after this the county moved the Poor House to five miles southwest of Chatham, Virginia on Bear Skin Creek. In 1862 he bought land in Halifax County, VA near the place know as Birch, Virginia. At this time he engaged in the tanning business, tanning for customers and Government. This was during the War Between the States. In the meantime, about the year 1857, Abraham went to Surry County, N.C., where he bought 1600 acres of land at 75 cents per acre. By taking this quantity of he bought it cheap. At the close of the war his tanning business went down, and in 1867 he moved to Surry County and carried all of his children by his last wife.

Abraham and his last wife belonged to the Missionary Baptists. They both took an active part in the meetings.

In justice to my father and step-mother, I being of the first children and about five years old at the time of my father's second marriage, my stepmother was very kind to me. I lived with them until I was twenty years old except about ten months, during which I was in the army during the War Between the States. I don't remember in the twenty years seeing him drink strong drinks or using profane language. He surely lead a quiet life and greatly desired his children to do the same, I believe.

So it will be seen that he was the father of six children by his first wife aqnd eleven by his last wife - seventeen in all.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1316] Anderson Chaney the son of Nancy and Abraham, Sr., married Sallie White and to that union were born eight children: Robert, Manervy, William, Mary, Martha, Lettie, John, and Cooper.

Anderson lived to be nearly sixty years old. He was a member of Laurel Grove Baptist Church. When he died he was buried at the old home place one mile south of Pittston , Pittsylvania County, VA

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1317] Henry C. Chaney, the son of Nancy and Abraham Chaney, Sr., was born Dec 20, 1819, and died in 1891. He married Eliza Wood, and to that union nine children were born - William, Martha, Samuel, Elias P., Bolden, Mary, Sarah, D. Scott, and Harriet.

Henry C. was a farmer by occupation. He lived on a portion of his father's old place which he inherited.

Henry C. Was wonderfully blessed in this world especially in the dealings of the Lord and the Spirit of Grace. He told the writer of his troubles on account of his sins and how he wandered in darkness until one morning he wandered a north course from his house to a pine tree and then further to a bottom to pour forth his troubles to the Lord. All at once everything looked lovely. The sun was about one hour highin the morning he thought it looked the prettiest he ever saw it. This was indeed a great consolation to poor me, for I had just passed through the same troubles on account of my sins I hope. He was my dear old Uncle - felt, hough to be my brother in Spirit - I hope, in the church triumphant. He joined the Missionary Baptist's at Laurel Grove when he was a young man and was held in high esteem by them.

Henry C. died in the year 1890. His stay on earth was about 70 years. he was buried in the old Chaney Burying Ground on his place.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1321] Sallie Chaney the daughter of Nancy and Abraham Chaney, Sr., married Berry Baines and to them were born five children that I know of, They were: Geneva, Alice, Susan, Sallie, and Fannie.

I don't know how old she was at the time of her death, but suppose she was about sixty years old or older. I think she was buried at County Line Church, Halifax County, Virginia. At the time of her death she was living at her home on Elk Horn Creek near Peytonsburg, VA.

[NI1334] William Chaney, the son of Rueben Chaney, was born near Laurel Grove, Pittsylvania County, Virginia. While a young man in 1848, he and his father emigrated to the State of Indiana, and in the early part of his life there he engaged in the cattle business.

He was married there but it is not known what his wife's maiden name was. He raised two sons to my knowledge, whose names were Henry and Jesse.

William visited Virginia in 1889 and stayed until the Spring of 1890, visiting his kindred. He visited me while here and stayed part of his time with Henry C. Chaney and in Laurel Grove neighborhood among his relatives. He said that he wanted to see one more time the old place where he spent his childhood days and to drink some water from the old spring. He went back home to Indiana and died soon after his return.

He was a member of Missionary Baptists and seemed to be devoted to the Cause, taking an active part in the meetings while here.

He died in the year 1890 though I do not know how old he was at the time of his death. However, I suppose he was sixty or more years old.

written in 1907 by Henry Watson Chaney

[NI1362] William H. Payne was born February 12, 1832, the son of Leroy and Racheal Hill Payne. He married Edith Chaney in 1855. He was a farmer by trade and lived in Whitmell, Pittsylvania Co. Virginia. It may not be well said that he was a true Confederate veteran since he deserted. It's been told that he would plow his fields by night so no one would know he was home. He wanted to be with his family. He later suffered from epeleptic seizures that resulted from a fight that he and his son, John J. Payne engaged in with some members of the Cabell family. He died in 1903 at 71 years of age.

Edith Chaney Payne was the daughter of Jackson and Ann Milam Chaney. She was born 1839 in Laurel Grove Pittsylvania Co., Virginia. Not much is known of Edith except that she was a housewife. She died in 1913.

William and Edith had 10 children: John Jackson Payne, Thomas R. Payne, Leroy T. Payne, William Payne, George Daniel Payne, Joseph Thomas Payne, Martha Payne, Fannie Payne (Still), Nathaniel S. Payne, and Henry R. Payne.

[NI1370] Willis C. Chaney, tho son of Nancy and William Chaney, was born April 14, 1816. He married Paulina Callaway and to this union there were born thirteen children. They were: Eliza A., John C., Ellis B., Ellen E., Sallie A., Virginia E., James M., William P., Littleton T., Nannie P., Pattie W., Mary J., and Emma.

Willis C. bought the farm known at that time as the Hill Place on mile north of Laurel Grove, Virginia, on Geremy Creek. He lived there a good while and sold out. Then he bought what is now known at the late Joseph Schofield place.

He joined Laurel Grove Baptist Church a while before he died. I do not know how old he was or the place of burial.

[NI1372] Calvin W. Chaney, the son of Nancy and William Chaney, was born December 20, 1819. His wife's name was Jane Holt. From this union there were born six children - William M., Henry P., George F., Felix Y., Sallie J., and Whit T.

Calvin W.bought land on Geremy Creek joining his brother Willis and lived there for some time and sold out. He then bought the place from Abraham Chaney now known as the late Joseph Davis place. He died and was buried on the place mentioned last. I do not know his age.

[NI1376] Jasper N. Chaney, the son of Elizabeth and William Chaney, was born March 1, 1827 and died December 27, 1875. His age was 48 years, 9 months, and 26 days. He was buried at his father's old place, where he llived during his life.

Jasper N. Chaney served in the War Between the States.

[NI1380] Daniel S. Chaney the son of Elizabeth and William Chaney, was born Sept. 20, 1836. He married Emily Shelton and to this union nine children were born: William H. , Charles, James Edward, Robert I., Raleigh J., Joseph, Mary B., Emily, and Joshua.

Daniel S. joined the army during the War Between the States in 1861. He fought through the whole war in Pickett's Division of Lee's Army and was in many a hard fought battle.

His occupation is farming and is living at the time of this writing on his place one and one-half miles southwest of Laurel Grove,Virginia. This place is a portion of his father's old tract, where he raised all of his children.

[NI1382] Beverly W. Chaney the son of Elizabeth and William Chaney, was born April 23, 1845. He married a Miss Walton, the daughter of Banister Walton, and to this union there were born seven children: Sallie B., Virgis, Pattie H., Mamie L., William, Wister, and Annie.

Beverly W. is a farmer by occupation. He fought during the War Between th States with Pickett's Division. He owns his father's old place where he was born and lived all his life.

[NI1649] Possibly was the best-advertised youngster ever in the White House. Because
he was the grandson of a President who was in turn the grandson of a President
the newspapers seized upon him.

[NI1835]
Abram F. Franklin CHANEY (Frank H.)

Ancestors of Frank Chaney were from Holland. He was "red dutch". According to
(Cleo Easton Nichols)

Frank' s father was born in North Carolina according to the
(1880 Pike Co., Ark. census)
Frank' s father was born in South Carolina according to the
(1910 Polk Co., Ark. census)

1814 Frank's mother, Matilda was born in North Carolina. Both of her parents were born in North Carolina.
(1880 Pike Co., Census)
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark. Census)


1858 Frank was born 13 Nov., 1858 in Alabama
(1880 Pike Co., Census)
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark. Census)
(Marriage License)

1879 Frank married Winnie Casinder Ellon Ownsby 20 Feb., 1879 in Montgomery Co., Ark.
He lived in Pike Co., Ark. when they married
Winnie lived in Montgomery Co., Ark. when they married.
(Marriage License)

1880 Frank and Winnie lived in White Township, Pike Co., Ark in 1880.
Franks mother Matilda lived with them.
(1880 Pike Co., Ark. Census)

Frank & Winnie had 3 children who died in infancy before 1900.
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark. Census)

1887 Frank & Winnie lived in Star Of The West, Pike Co., Ark.
Esper was born there.
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark., Census)


1889/90 Frank & Winnie lived in Star Of The West, Pike Co., Ark.
Calvin was born there.
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark., Census)
(May Chaney Clift)

1891 Frank & Winnie lived in Ellis Co., Texas.
George Franklin was born there.
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark., Census)
(May Chaney Clift)

1893 Frank & Winnie lived in Honey Grove, Fannin Co.
Amanda May was born there.
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark., Census)

1895 Frank & Winnie lived in Star Of The West, Pike Co., Ark.
Millie Phebie Junior was born there.
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark., Census)

1897 Frank & Winnie lived in Pike Co., Ark (Mortgage dtd 16 Jan. 1897)
Frank & Winnie lived in Pocola, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory
Ira was born there.
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark., Census)

1900 Frank & Winnie lived in Rye Hill or Bonanza Area, Sebastian Co. Ark.
Marion Township
(1900 Sebastion Co., Ark., Census)

1901 Frank & Winnie Lived in Pocola, C.N. , I.T.
Zedekiah was born there.

1903 Frank & Winnie Lived in Williams, C.N. , I.T.
Esper was married in their home.

1906 In the last part of 1906 Frank & Winnie moved near Board Camp, Polk Co., Ark. They lived there until their death.
Frank & Winnie joined the Midway Free Will Baptist Church about 1906 and were members until their death. Frank was a deacon.

1917 Frank died 29 July, 1917 at Board Camp, Polk Co., Ark. He had measles and got a bowel lock which caused his death.
(Tombstone)
(Cleo Easton Nichols)

1944 Winnie died 17 Feb., 1944 at Board Camp, Polk Co., Ark.
(Obituary)
(Tombstone)

Palmer Lee Pace
McAlester, Ok.
lee@@edumaster.net

[NI2020] Posted to Genforum by Joyce Heiss on April 29, 1998 at 19:11:32:
In Reply to: Re: The Chaney Genealogy Project posted by cathi curry on April 23, 1998 at 22:33:53:
SUSANNAH CHANEY - I need any information regarding Susannah Chaney. I do not know her parents, siblings or any ancestors. She was born 12 Jul 1816, Bedford Co., PA; died 18 Jan 1896, Bucyrus, Crawford Co., OH; md. c 1839, Bedford Co., PA Hugh SHECKLER, b. Jul 1815, Bloody Run (now Everett), PA. A burial record for a John RAMSEY (1823-1850) stated that Mrs. Hugh Sheckler was his sister. John Ramsey was buried in their cemetery plot. Was Susannah's surname Chaney or Ramsey? (One of her sons had the middle name Chaney.) or was her maiden name Ramsey, but she had married a Chaney? I would like to correspond with anyone with ANY information about this woman.

[NI2025] Posted by Sharon Carver on April 26, 1998 at 18:01:22:
In Reply to: desendents of Richard Chaney and Lydia of Maryland posted by Carol A. Peterson on April 24, 1998 at 23:05:39:
Based upon the Will of Richard Chaney, Dec.1,1823 Cooper Co,MO., these are his descendants as they are numbered and spelled in the Will. Other data referenced is Census and Marriage Records.
His wife Lydia Chaney and a son-in-law, John Henry, are administrators of the Will:
1)John Chaney (previously deceased) (Oct.1822)
One of John's wives was Nancy Poer. Based on the Will of John Chaney (Oct. 1822, Cooper Co. MO)they had one child at the time of his death:
William Harrison Chaney (Nancy had died earlier) William Harrison Chaney married Eliza Elizabeth Hieronymous and they had 7 sons and 2 dau.:
John Eagear Chaney M. Martha J. Masters
Anna Eliza Chaney M. Sylvester Smiley
Edward Moses Chaney M. Mary Elizabeth Tivis. 2nd wife Nancy Elizabeth Harris
William Rector Chaney M. Amanda F. Burton
Sarah Charlotte Chaney M. James A. Capen
Henry B. Chaney M. Melissa Samantha Fidialia
James Ambrose Chaney M. Leora Ann Elizabeth Curry
Alfranzo Chaney
George Rector Chaney M. Stella Allen
Frank Morgan Chaney M. Nannie E. Owen
2)Nancy Sharp (Chaney) M. Charles Sharp
3)Elizabeth Bickett (Chaney) M. Benjamin Beckett
4)Sally Colclasure (Chaney) M. Abraham Calcleasher
5)Lydia Henry (Chaney) M. John Henry
6)Polly Chaney
7)Nathan Chaney M. Hannah Grooms. 2nd wife Martha Milsaps
Children by 1st Wife:
Hannah Chaney
Mary Chaney
Sarah Chaney
Richard P. Chaney
Margaret Chaney
William Chaney (M. Drucilla Henry).
8)William Chaney M. Mary Polly Jane Brundedge
Samuel Preston Chaney (M. Martha Surles)
Elizabeth Chaney
Sally Ann Chaney
Joseph Chaney (M. Nancy Ward)
Pauline Chaney
Thomas Chaney (M. Matilda)
Washington Chaney
Mary Chaney
Henry C. Chaney (M. Malinda Burnett)
Jefferson Chaney
Alexander Chaney (M. Sarah Goodwin).
9)Rachel Chaney (her name has diagonal slashes thru it)
10)Henry Chaney M. Lucinda Allison
Mary E. Chaney
Louisa A. Chaney
Joseph J. Chaney
Susan J. Chaney
Orinda Chaney
Margaret Chaney
Moses C. Chaney
Nancy Arminda Chaney
William G. Chaney
Charles H. Chaney.
Richard (R.)Chaney M. Martha H. Fields
John Chaney
Sulluann Chaney
Francis M. Chaney
Angeline Chaney
Moses Chaney M. Katherine Driskell
Lydia Chaney is listed on the 1830 Census of Cooper Co,MO as being 60-70 years old.
In "History of Pettis Co,MO" c1882 page 842, William Harrison Chaney states he was born in Clark Co,KY, Dec 25,1814. His father (that would be John Chaney) served in the War of 1812, his grandparents (that would be Richard and Lydia) came to MO in 1822, his grandmother lived in MD during the War of the Revolution and that she and her husband were among the first settlers of KY as well as of MO. She lived to the ripe old age of 105 years.
In "Old Men of Clay Co,MO" c1870 page 123. Nathan Chaney states his father (that would be Richard Chaney) was born in MD and moved to KY in 1785, he was a soldier in the Continental Army and also served against the North Western Indians.
"Archives of MD Muster Rolls During the War of the American Revolution, 1775-83" page 91. Musters of Maryland Troops, Vol. I - Richard Chaney enlisted Dec 10, 1776.
Fayette Co,KY Tax List 1789 lists Richard Chiney
the spelling changes to Cheney on the 1791 Tax List.
QUESTIONS:
"Anne Arundel Co,MD Church Records - All Hallows Parish" page 57 lists Isaiah Cheney and Sarah as parents of Richard Jacob Cheney b. Oct. 17, 1756; Elijah Cheney b. Aug 3, 1760. Isaiah and a second wife, Rachell, as parents of William Mordecai Cheney b. Oct. 25, 1765.
Does anyone know if this is the correct Richard Chaney ?
Does anyone know if Henry is the male (age 20-30) who was living with Lydia Chaney in the 1830 Cooper Co, MO Census and who was the little girl (age 5-10)? Henry didn't marry Lucinda Allison until 1832.
The other sons are listed in the Census Index of 1830 MO.
Does anyone know If/how the other 2 Chaney's in the 1830 Census are related to the Richard & Lydia Chaney line? They are Elizabeth Chaney and Heritage Chaney both in Boone Co.
Who is the father of the John Chaney who M. Ann Hall and is listed on the 1840 Cooper Co,MO Census (age 30-40)?
On the Census of 1820 Clark Co,KY, John Chaney has several children under the age of 10, yet only one child (William Harrison Chaney) is listed in his Will on Oct. 1822, what happened to all the other children? If they died, has anyone found a record or tombstone of this?

[NI2026] In "History of Pettis Co,MO" c1882 page 842, William Harrison Chaney states he was born in Clark Co,KY, Dec 25,1814. His father (that would be John Chaney) served in the War of 1812, his grandparents (that would be Richard and Lydia) came to MO in 1822, his grandmother lived in MD during the War of the Revolution and that she and her husband were among the first settlers of KY as well as of MO. She lived to the ripe old age of 105 years.

In "Old Men of Clay Co,MO" c1870 page 123. Nathan Chaney states his father (that would be Richard Chaney) was born in MD and moved to KY in 1785, he was a soldier in the Continental Army and also served against the North Western Indians.

"Archives of MD Muster Rolls During the War of the American Revolution, 1775-83" page 91. Musters of Maryland Troops, Vol. I - Richard Chaney enlisted Dec 10, 1776.
Fayette Co,KY Tax List 1789 lists Richard Chiney
the spelling changes to Cheney on the 1791 Tax List.

[NI2028] In "History of Pettis Co,MO" c1882 page 842, William Harrison Chaney states he was born in Clark Co,KY, Dec 25,1814. His father (that would be John Chaney) served in the War of 1812, his grandparents (that would be Richard and Lydia) came to MO in 1822, his grandmother lived in MD during the War of the Revolution and that she and her husband were among the first settlers of KY as well as of MO. She lived to the ripe old age of 105 years.

[NI2034] In "Old Men of Clay Co,MO" c1870 page 123. Nathan Chaney states his father (that would be Richard Chaney) was born in MD and moved to KY in 1785, he was a soldier in the Continental Army and also served against the North Western Indians.

[NI2039] In "History of Pettis Co,MO" c1882 page 842, William Harrison Chaney states he was born in Clark Co,KY, Dec 25,1814. His father (that would be John Chaney) served in the War of 1812, his grandparents (that would be Richard and Lydia) came to MO in 1822, his grandmother lived in MD during the War of the Revolution and that she and her husband were among the first settlers of KY as well as of MO. She lived to the ripe old age of 105 years.

[NI2063] Lydia Chaney is listed on the 1830 Census of Cooper Co,MO as being 60-70 years old.

[NI2119] Abraham Chaney b.1760 @@Halifax, Virginia. Abram's father, Jacob, (b.1715) did come from Anne Arundel Co., MD; and, his father, Charles, b. June 6, 1673, did have a half-brother, Richard 'b.1649/
1650'. They are sons of the CHEYNEY emigrant, *Richard (b.`1627) in Kent, Eng.

Posted to Genforum by Preston Glenn Humphrey on April 26, 1998

[NI2120] Abraham Chaney b.1760 @@Halifax, Virginia. Abram's father, Jacob, (b.1715) did come from Anne Arundel Co., MD; and, his father, Charles, b. June 6, 1673, did have a half-brother, Richard 'b.1649/
1650'. They are sons of the CHEYNEY emigrant, *Richard (b.`1627) in Kent, Eng.

Posted to Genforum by Preston Glenn Humphrey on April 26, 1998

Richard Cheyney m. Eleanor
son Charles Cheney m. Ann Jones another son Richard Cheyney m. Rachel Nicholson
son Green Berry Chaney married cousin daughter Elizabeth Chaney
?their son Green Berry Chaney b. Md d. 1779 Wilkes Co, Ga - was a lawyer there
?his son Green Berry Chaney d 1830/40 Washington Co, Alabama m. Elizabeth Middlebrooks dau of Isaac Middlebrooks & Elizabeth Perkins
their son Gren Berry Chaney b. 1794 Wilkes Co, Ga m 1821 Marengo Co, Ala Caroline Hainsworth
daughter Sarah C. "Sally" Chaney b 1825 Washington Co, Ala d. Marengo Co, Ala m. 1839 sumter Co, Ala Arthur Meriwether Lewis
there also was another generation of Green Berry's - brother to Sarah

Posted to Genforum by Dianne Conaway Blankenstein on November 15, 1997

[NF041] "Horatio and Anna Dixon were married July 23, 1874 at Dixon, Indiana.
Witness by J.W. Ingersoll and John Sneider, signed Lea Fisher."

[NF056] <-- "Record of Marriages, Nelson County, Kentucky 1730-1834">

"11-24-1818, HARRIET WRIGHT married CHARLES WALKER, father JOSEPH WRIGHT, bondsman WILLIAM NIELL." (page 169)


[NF135] <-- "Record of Marriages, Nelson County, Kentucky 1730-1834" Newberry Library E-6906014.62>

"AMANDA WRIGHT married WILLIAM SWEET, father JOSEPH, 1828" (page 160)

[NF386] Source: 1. General Index of Marriages - Bell County, Texas
Zettie Chaney - Ed Witt 1903, Vol 0, Page 317

[NF394] General Index of Marriages -- Bell County, Texas
Beatrice Chaney -- D.C. Williams 1932 Vol 29, Page 511

[NS130891] Martha Jane Chaney married Albert Lock before 1884 -- the date of his death. Albert and Martha were my Great Grandparents. I believe they were married in Kentucky

[NS130892] unknown

[NS130893] dlock@@galstar.com

[NS75611] Copy provided to Rooseve Fern Dixon on February 24, 1907

[NS75612] Okay

[NS87442] Good

[NS87443] Lucille Hunt - Anderson

[NS91751] Copy provided to Rooseve Fern Dixon on February 24, 1907

[NS91752] Okay

[NS133761] I still live in the house that my Great Grandfather Allen W Chaney owned in the 1870's in Prince George's County, Maryland. I know that my ancestors came from Anne Arundel County, which is just acros s the river

[NS133762] unknown

[NS133763] rodl@@sprynet.com

[NS142851] Posted by Sharon Carver on April 26, 1998 at 18:01:22:
In Reply to: desendents of Richard Chaney and Lydia of Maryland posted by Carol A. Peterson on April 24, 1998 at 23:05:39:
Based upon the Will of Richard Chaney, Dec.1,1823 Cooper Co,MO., these are his descendants as they are numbered and spelled in the Will. Other data referenced is Census and Marriage Records.
His wife Lydia Chaney and a son-in-law, John Henry, are administrators of the Will:
1)John Chaney (previously deceased) (Oct.1822)
One of John's wives was Nancy Poer. Based on the Will of John Chaney (Oct. 1822, Cooper Co. MO)they had one child at the time of his death:
William Harrison Chaney (Nancy had died earlier) William Harrison Chaney married Eliza Elizabeth Hieronymous and they had 7 sons and 2 dau.:
John Eagear Chaney M. Martha J. Masters
Anna Eliza Chaney M. Sylvester Smiley
Edward Moses Chaney M. Mary Elizabeth Tivis. 2nd wife Nancy Elizabeth Harris
William Rector Chaney M. Amanda F. Burton
Sarah Charlotte Chaney M. James A. Capen
Henry B. Chaney M. Melissa Samantha Fidialia
James Ambrose Chaney M. Leora Ann Elizabeth Curry
Alfranzo Chaney
George Rector Chaney M. Stella Allen
Frank Morgan Chaney M. Nannie E. Owen
2)Nancy Sharp (Chaney) M. Charles Sharp
3)Elizabeth Bickett (Chaney) M. Benjamin Beckett
4)Sally Colclasure (Chaney) M. Abraham Calcleasher
5)Lydia Henry (Chaney) M. John Henry
6)Polly Chaney
7)Nathan Chaney M. Hannah Grooms. 2nd wife Martha Milsaps
Children by 1st Wife:
Hannah Chaney
Mary Chaney
Sarah Chaney
Richard P. Chaney
Margaret Chaney
William Chaney (M. Drucilla Henry).
8)William Chaney M. Mary Polly Jane Brundedge
Samuel Preston Chaney (M. Martha Surles)
Elizabeth Chaney
Sally Ann Chaney
Joseph Chaney (M. Nancy Ward)
Pauline Chaney
Thomas Chaney (M. Matilda)
Washington Chaney
Mary Chaney
Henry C. Chaney (M. Malinda Burnett)
Jefferson Chaney
Alexander Chaney (M. Sarah Goodwin).
9)Rachel Chaney (her name has diagonal slashes thru

[NS142852] unknown

[NS142853] http://www.genforum.com/chaney/

[NS123292] Unknown

[NS123293] dharrell@@westga.edu

[NS140811] MARY ANN CHANEY b 30 March 1805 near Baltimore MD
and Married a Jesse ASHCRAFT on 16 sep 1824 Knox Co, OH
Mary died in 1864 and is buried in Mt Zion Cemetary and joseph died 31 Jul 1871 in bladensburg and is also buried in Mt Zion Cemetary in Bladensburg Oh are

Her parents were
JOSEPH CHANEY (1778-1859) and Elizabeth O'CONNOR (1781-1863)

[NS140812] unknown

[NS140813] mapage@@prodigy.net

[NS45641] SUSANNAH CHANEY - I need any information regarding Susannah Chaney. I do not know her parents, siblings or any ancestors. She was born 12 Jul 1816, Bedford Co., PA; died 18 Jan 1896, Bucyrus, Crawfor d Co., OH; md. c 1839, Bedford Co., PA Hugh SHECKLER, b. Jul 1815, Bloody Run (now Everett), PA. A burial record for a John RAMSEY (1823-1850) stated that Mrs. Hugh Sheckler was his sister. John Ramse y was buried in their cemetery plot. Was Susannah's surname Chaney or Ramsey? (One of her sons had the middle name Chaney.) or was her maiden name Ramsey, but she had married a Chaney?

[NS45642] Unknown

[NS45643] http://www.genforum.com/chaney/

[NS129691] My Great Grandfather Joshua lived most of his life around Danville, Illinois. My Great Grandfather Oscar Henry Chany also lived around Danville, Illinois. His birthday was January 1, 1900. He was m arried in Ohio and moved to southern Michigan in area of Niles, Michigan

[NS129692] unknown

[NS129693] DCV351C4V@@aol.com

[NS132491] Looking for Stoud that live in Fulton County, Arkansas. Great Grandfather Samuel Stroud was born in Arkansas about 1836. Census records show that both of his parents were born in North Carolina.

Aunts on Stroud side are Goldie and Imogene

[NS132492] unknown

[NS132493] llamb@@gator1.brazosport.cc.tx.us

[NS65322] Good

[NS67431] Based on Information from Adelia Jane Berry (McAfee)

[NS67432] Good

[NS67433] Robert J Chaney

[NS87042] Good

[NS87043] Robert J Chaney

[NS133221] Looking for the parents of John Anderson Walls [25 Sep 1865 - 5 Oct 1951]; believe them both to be from South Carolina. Believe their names to be Anderson and Gussie Ann Price Walls. John was born a nd lived most of his life in Plum Branch, South Carolina. He died in Greenwood, South Carolina and is buried in McCormick. He married Sallie Ann Langley [17 Jul 1872 - 28 Apr 1934]

[NS133222] poor

[NS133223] boykinlvr@@aol.com

[NS142301] Posted by Rob Buck on April 16, 1998 at 23:13:00:
In Reply to: The Chaney Genealogy Project posted by Bob Chaney on April 16, 1998 at 15:25:54:
Grandmother Carrie Chaney, 9th generation in Maine, decended from Jonathan Chaney, landed,
Parker River, Rowley, Mass, 1620. Also two links
to Mayflower (big deal) through Chaney links.
Ever read Chaney Geo. by Pope. Lots of info.
Dr. Honberger (aka Richard Hooker - wrote MASH, 2nd cousin in Maine (just died) from Breman ME,
where "Call of the Wild" Jack London (mother a
Chaney) came from. Lot's of other stuff. I'm
52 yrs and have quite a file.

[NS142302] unknown

[NS142303] http://www.genforum.com/chaney/

[NS124882] unknown

[NS124883] msb@@myfamily.org

[NS134681] My Grandfather James Markus Chaney was born in Hickory County, Missouri in 1879

[NS134682] unknown

[NS134683] dcc@@aloha.net

[NS147901] Richard Cheyney m. Eleanor
son Charles Cheney m. Ann Jones another son Richard Cheyney m. Rachel Nicholson
son Green Berry Chaney married cousin daughter Elizabeth Chaney
?their son Green Berry Chaney b. Md d. 1779 Wilkes Co, Ga - was a lawyer there
?his son Green Berry Chaney d 1830/40 Washington Co, Alabama m. Elizabeth Middlebrooks dau of Isaac Middlebrooks & Elizabeth Perkins
their son Gren Berry Chaney b. 1794 Wilkes Co, Ga m 1821 Marengo Co, Ala Caroline Hainsworth
daughter Sarah C. "Sally" Chaney b 1825 Washington Co, Ala d. Marengo Co, Ala m. 1839 sumter Co, Ala Arthur Meriwether Lewis
there also was another generation of Green Berry's - brother to Sarah

[NS147902] unknown

[NS110912] fair

[NS110913] http://www.wizard.com/~bascs/mypage.htm

[NS45142] Good

[NS45143] http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/8189/

[NS123542] Unknown

[NS123543] jacdan@@datastream.net

[NS34672] Good

[NS127072] unknown

[NS127073] lee@@edumaster.net

[NS122891] Notice that you are researchiong John Cleves Short. I am assisting someone on some Jefferson research and am presently reading a book, "Jefferson's Adoptive Son-William Short 1759-1848" are you famili ar with it? William was Pres. Jefferson's personal secretary and was the brother of Peyton Short, father of John Cleves Short and his brother, Charles Wilkins Short.

[NS122892] Unknown

[NS122893] herbar@@erols.com

[NS92802] Okay

[NS131321] Hez Chaney married Jane, who moved to Montgomery County, Virginia [name changes to Wyeth County in 1790] in 1775, living there until he died in 1812. Had five boys and six girls.
Able R, Hezakiah Jr., Archibald, Hiram, Hoseah, Sally [Williams], Betsy [Stone], Polly [Stone], Jenny [Cowden], Nancy [Cowden] and Caty.
My line, Able married Esther F Thompson in 1816 in Tennessee, moved to Monroe County, Tennessee [listed in 1850 Tennessee Census as A R Chaney]. His son Robert Calvin Chaney [my gggf] moved to Texa s in 1860, fights in the Civil War, lives and moves back to Texas in 1864

[NS131322] unknown

[NS131323] ronsrx@@texas.net

[NS64131] This dataset was created by:

Brian Tompsett
Department of Computer Science
University of Hull
Hull, UK, HU6 7RX
bct@@dcs.hull.ac.uk

[NS64132] Good

[NS64133] http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/

[NS87241] From research of Rooseve Fern Hunt

[NS87242] Good

[NS92152] Okay

[NS129941] My mother's maiden name was Margaret Jean Ames, born Aug 28, 1924 of Arizona Crider and Denver Ames. My Grandmother (Arizona Crider) later married Robert Goodwin, therefore my mother's name is incorr ectly listed as Margaret Goodwin.
I was born June 26, 1961 in Los Angeles, California. I married Susan Lynch on July 1,1989. We have one son Aaron Matthew Hittson born Feb 4, 1991. My father Thomas Kenneth Hittson died Dec 18, 1983 . My aunt Mary Juanita Hittson died Jan 10, 1998

[NS129942] unknown

[NS129943] julyslh@@aol.com

[NS96361] From: Carl Chaney Branstetter (lazzers@@worldnet.att.net)
Host/Computer: 207.146.88.26
Date: Wed Jul 16 20:30:32 1997

Porter Franklin Chaney
Does anyone have a link to a Porter Franklin Chaney of Horse Caves, Ky. (about 1850)?

[NS96362] Unknown

[NS96363] lazzer@@worldnet.att.net

[NS117372] Okay

[NS117373] http://www.xnet.com/~mkshouse/shouse/index.htm#s138b

[NS72591] From: John L. Daniel (Danielgen@@aol.com)
Host/Computer: 207.146.53.201
Date: Sun Aug 3 11:38:47 1997

Cheney Family
Looking for the parents of John Cheney, Jr. b. 20 Apr 1796 MD m. c1817 GA Lucy Owen d. c1836 TX

[NS72592] Unknown

[NS72593] danielgen@@aol.com

[NS124341] Charles Chaney born ca 1750's probably in Maryland and died 1814 or 1815 in Frederick County, Maryland. He had a son Charles born in 1781 or 1782 in Maryland and married Sarah Dunham in Maryland in 1 799. They eventually moved to Ohio.

[NS124342] unknown

[NS124343] rgerber@@sssnet.com

[NS130671] Delbert was my Grandfather's brother, Roy Hittson. I know his dad was a Grover Cleveland Hittson and his mother was Avo York

[NS130672] unknown

[NS130673] cmrice@@micoks.net

[NS134061] My husband's Grandmother was Elvie Ruby Weatherman, daughter of Newton Ellis and Luesia Martin Weatherman. Newton Ellis Weatherman had a brother named John Lewis Franklin Weatherman. I show their pa rents as John Henry [b. 1819 in Surry County, North Carolina] and Louisa Eliza [born 1823 in Surry County, North Carolina]

[NS134062] unknown

[NS134063] vcbdad@@ixnetcom.com

[NS73332] Okay

[NS79571] I am searching for Moses Jackson Sr. - b1747 in perquimqns Co NC, his
son Moses Jackson - b1773 in Perquimqns Co NC, who was married to
Rebecca, and their son Moses S. Jackson - b1827 in Walker Co GA
know. Thanks.

[NS79572] unknown

[NS79573] angus55@@webtv.net

[NS132861] James Chaney came to America after April 1871. He was baptised at Topcroft Church in Topcroft, England in 1866. Upon arrival in America he went directly to Mattoon, Illinois, remaining there all o f his life

[NS132862] unknown

[NS132863] jschaney@@soltec.net

[NS87371] This site was viewed by Hunt and Dixon descendants including Martha D Chaney, BJ Chaney, Amanda L Chaney and Terri G Chaney

[NS87372] Good

[NS87373] Hunt Family Cemetary

[NS118182] Okay

[NS118183] Robert J Chaney

[NS129391] My mother is Kathyrn Chaney Easley. Her father was Lloyd Willa Chaney born April 25, 1892. His father was Cephas Bascome Chaney.

[NS129392] unknown

[NS129393] chadwell@@marktwain.net

[NS92342] Good

[NS93052] Okay

[NS118262] Good

[NS118263] Adelia Jane Berry

[NS147651] Abraham Chaney b.1760 @@Halifax
Virginia.
Abram's father, Jacob, (b.1715) did come from Anne
Arundel Co., MD; and, his father, Charles, b. June
6, 1673, did have a half-brother, Richard 'b.1649/
1650'. They are sons of the CHEYNEY emigrant,
*Richard (b.`1627) in Kent, Eng.

[NS147652] unknown

[NS123871] James Chaney / Cheney came to Virginia from Ireland about 1699 - 1700. Name changed to Cheney spelling about 1800 in Black Swamp area of Beufort District, SC. These Cheneys were cousin to a Franci s Chaney who had a son named John Chaney who fought in SC during the Revolutionary War. At the same time as John Cheney / Chaney (m) Martha Susan Fendin.

[NS123872] unknown

EMAIL HOME


HTML created by GED2HTML v3.0 (2/2/97) on Thu May 07 13:14:43 1998.